Sonos Amp at CEDIA 2018

The new Sonos Amp can power four wired speakers and accept signals from HDMI and analog-audio sources, integrating them all into the Sonos wireless whole-home audio ecosystem.
Today, Sonos unveils the newest member of its whole-home audio system: the Sonos Amp. It’s a home-audio hub that powers traditional wired speakers with signals from nearly any source, and it fully integrates those speakers into the Sonos wireless home-audio system. The all-new Sonos Amp is twice as powerful as its predecessor, the Connect:Amp, with the ability to power up to four speakers with 125 watts per channel.
The Sonos Amp is designed to fit perfectly into standard AV racks used by custom installers. Inputs include HDMI and line-level analog audio, and an HDMI output offers ARC (Audio Return Channel) for audio coming from a TV’s internal apps. Even better, source devices such as TVs, turntables, and CD players become part of a Sonos system


Original URL: https://www.avsforum.com/sonos-amp-cedia-2018/

Original article

US Court of Appeals: An IP Address Isn’t Enough To Identify a Pirate

A judge has ruled that copyright trolls need more than just an IP address if they want to go after copyright infringement. An IP is not enough proof to tie a person to a crime. From a report: In a win for privacy advocates and pirates, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that an IP address alone is not enough to go after someone for alleged copyright infringement. They ruled that being the registered subscriber of an infringing IP address does not create a reasonable inference that the subscriber is also the infringer. The case began back in 2016 and has been playing out in the legal system ever since. The creators of the film “The Cobbler” alleged that Thomas Gonzales had illegally downloaded their movie and sued him for it. Gonzales was a Comcast subscriber and had set up his network with an open Wi-Fi access point. At


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/Iwqf9xC1O_U/us-court-of-appeals-an-ip-address-isnt-enough-to-identify-a-pirate

Original article

What Dropbox Dropping Linux Support Says

Jack Wallen, writing for TechRepublic: For a company to support Linux, they have to consider supporting: Multiple file systems, multiple distributions, multiple desktops, multiple init systems, multiple kernels. If you’re an open source developer, focusing on a single distribution, that’s not a problem. If you’re a company that produces a product (and you stake your living on that product), those multiple points of entry do become a problem. Let’s consider Adobe (and Photoshop). If Adobe wanted to port their industry-leading product to Linux, how do they do that? Do they spend the time developing support for ext4, btrfs, Ubuntu, Fedora, GNOME, Mate, KDE, systemd? You see how that might look from the eyes of any given company? It becomes even more complicated when companies consider how accustomed to the idea of “free” (as in beer) Linux users are. Although I am very willing to pay for software on Linux, it’s


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/qIuqsWuXbzg/what-dropbox-dropping-linux-support-says

Original article

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: