Parallels Desktop 14 is available now for Mac, and it includes Mojave support

Enlarge / Parallels Desktop 14 running Windows 10 in macOS High Sierra. (credit: Samuel Axon)
A new version of Mac-based virtualization software Parallels Desktop was released today. Parallels Desktop 14 offers disk space efficiency improvements, faster application-launch speeds, macOS Mojave support, expanded Touch Bar support, better OpenGL graphics performance, and several other improvements.
Most people who use Parallels use it to run Windows within macOS, and the updates focus on that by improving performance and adding new features to make the two operating systems work more seamlessly together.
The key feature the Parallels team is pushing for this release is storage optimization. Virtual machines can take up a lot of space, and that can be a problem when you’re working with limited solid-state storage in modern MacBooks. This release claims to free up significant disk space in most (but not all) cases—up to 20GB in some situations. There’s also a “Free Up


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1362303

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Valve’s “Steam Play” uses Vulkan to bring more Windows games to Linux

(credit: Aurich Lawson)
Valve announced today a beta of Steam Play, a new compatibility layer for Linux to provide compatibility with a wide range of Windows-only games.
We’ve been tracking Valve’s efforts to boost Linux gaming for a number of years. As of a few months ago, things seemed to have gone very quiet, with Valve removing SteamOS systems from its store. Last week, however, it became clear that something was afoot for Linux gaming.
The announcement today spells out in full what the company has developed. At its heart is a customized, modified version of the WINE Windows-on-Linux compatibility layer named Proton. Compatibility with Direct3D graphics is provided by vkd3d, an implementation of Direct3D 12 that uses Vulkan for high performance, and DXVK, a Vulkan implementation of Direct3D 11.
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Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1362591

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Steam Gets Built-in Tools To Let You Run Windows Games on Linux — Now Available in Beta

Steam Play — Valve’s name for its cross-platform initiative — is getting a major update, adding built-in tools that would allow users to run Windows games on Linux. It’s now available in beta. From a report: The new tools run on Proton, which is custom distribution of the widely-used Wine compatibility tool. In the most practical terms, this means you can now download and install Windows games directly from the Steam client without any further fuss. Valve is currently checking “the entire Steam catalog” and whitelisting games that run without issue, but you can turn off those guidelines and install whatever you want, too. Proton should provide enhanced performance over Wine in many cases, according to Valve. DirectX 11 and 12 implementations are now based on Vulkan, and performance in multi-threaded games “has been greatly improved compared to vanilla Wine.” You’ll also see better fullscreen and controller support with Proton.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/dlygZFTl4Hs/steam-gets-built-in-tools-to-let-you-run-windows-games-on-linux----now-available-in-beta

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