Instapaper is Going Independent

Popular bookmarking and read-it-later app, Instapaper made the following announcement in a blog post: Today, we’re announcing that Pinterest has entered into an agreement to transfer ownership of Instapaper to Instant Paper, Inc., a new company owned and operated by the same people who’ve been working on Instapaper since it was sold to betaworks by Marco Arment in 2013. The ownership transfer will occur after a 21 day waiting period designed to give our users fair notice about the change of control with respect to their personal information. We want to emphasize that not much is changing for the Instapaper product outside the new ownership. The product will continue to be built and maintained by the same people who’ve been working on Instapaper for the past five years. We plan to continue offering a robust service that focuses on readers and the reading experience for the foreseeable future.

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Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/1RHwKCRBLGM/instapaper-is-going-independent

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Instapaper is leaving Pinterest, two years after being acquired

Back in August of 2016, Pinterest acquired Instapaper, the read-it-later bookmarking service originally built by Marco Arment.
Just shy of two years later, Instapaper is going back to being independent.
In a blog post published this afternoon, the team clarifies that a new company called “Instant Paper, Inc.” has been formed to oversee Instapaper, and that it’ll largely be made up of the same folks who’ve worked on it since ~2013.
Don’t expect much to change, for better or worse — at least, not immediately. The company is waiting three weeks before officially transferring ownership, in order to “give [its] users fair notice about the change of control with respect to their personal information.”
The team doesn’t outline the reasoning for splitting away, but it has many users hoping its newly regained independence means it can become GDPR-compliant sooner than later. Instapaper shut off its services in Europe back in May so they could


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Highly Available Microservices with Health Checks and Circuit Breakers

Developers are turning to microservices in greater numbers to help break through the inflexibility of old monolithic applications. Microservices offer many benefits, including separation of concerns, team autonomy, fault tolerance, and scaling across multiple regions for high availability.
However, microservices also present challenges, including more infrastructure complexity to manage. You have more services to monitor for availability and performance. It’s also a challenge to balance load and route around failures to maintain high availability. If your services are stateful, you need to maintain persistent connections between clients and instances. Most API developers would prefer to have a system manage these infrastructure complexities so they can focus on the business logic.
In this article, we’ll describe how algorithms for load balancing help you deliver highly available services. Then, we’ll also show an example of how Kong makes it easier to deliver high availability with built-in health checks and circuit breakers. Kong is the


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FAST.com by Netflix Now Measures Latency and Upload Speed

A little over two years ago, we launched FAST.com – a free, fast, and simple way for people to check the speeds they’re getting from their internet service provider. Since then, the site has experienced incredibly strong organic growth. In fact, usage of FAST.com has doubled over the past seven months, * and the site has now generated more than half a billion speed tests from around the world.
We’ve heard from some FAST.com users that they crave more information about their internet connection. That’s why today, we’re adding the ability to measure connection latency and upload speed. Upload speed measures the speed of the connection for uploading data from a user’s device to the internet. Latency – which refers to the time it takes for data to travel from a user’s device to the server and back – will be measured on both unloaded and loaded connections. Unloaded latency measures


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