GitLab is open core, GitHub is closed source (2016)

Disclosure: I’m the CEO of GitLab and we compete with GitHub. We think of ourselves as an open source company. But today paxcoder on Hacker News rightly remarked that calling it an open core company is more accurate. We ship GitLab CE which is open source and GitLab EE that is closed source. We try to be a good steward of the open source project. GitLab EE is proprietary, closed source code but we try to work in a way similar to GitLab CE: the issue tracker is publicly viewable and the EE license allows modifications. When we mention that GitLab is available in an open source edition people frequently ask “Isn’t GitHub open source?”. I understand the confusion between open source hosting and open source software. The hosted service GitHub.com is free for open source projects and it has fundamentally improved open source collaboration. But the software GitHub’s service


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GitLab Isn’t Really Open-Source

Microsoft recently
announced
its acquisition of GitHub which has led to a
spike in the number of
repositories imported to GitLab. One reason for the spike is that GitLab often
touts itself as open-source, but that is only partially true.

GitLab has two version of its software – GitLab Community Edition, the
open-source version, and GitLab Enterprise Edition, the proprietary version.
Both
versions have their sources
published on GitLab with the former having an MIT license and the latter a
proprietary one which requires a paid subscription with GitLab.

Originally, both versions had an MIT license, but this changed in 2014 because
GitLab found that “the open source license of EE is
confusing” to
potential subscribers.

You can see the differences between these two versions on their
site. A lot
of them are focused on enterprise features such as LDAP and Kerberos
authentication, but many aren’t:

Host static pages (with TLS & CNAME support) from GitLab using GitLab Pages
Contribution Analytics, see detailed statistics of contributors
Rebase merge requests


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TensorFlow for Dummies

Google TensorFlow has become the darling of financial firms and research organizations, but the technology can be intimidating and the learning curve is steep. Luckily, TensorFlow For Dummies is here to offer you a friendly, easy-to-follow book on the subject. Inside, you’ll find out how to write applications with TensorFlow, while also grasping the concepts underlying machine learning – all without ever losing your cool!Machine learning has become ubiquitous in modern society, and its applications include language translation, robotics, handwriting analysis, financial prediction, and image recognition. TensorFlow is Google’s preeminent toolset for machine learning, and this hands-on guide makes it easy to understand, even for those without a background in artificial intelligence. Install TensorFlow on your computer; Learn the fundamentals of statistical regression and neural networks; Visualize the machine learning process with TensorBoard; Perform image recognition with convolutional neural networks (CNNs); Analyze sequential data with recurrent neural networks (RNNs);


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Linux 4.17 Released

Mark Wycislik-Wilson, writing for BetaNews: In his weekly message to the Linux community on Sunday, Linus Torvalds announced the release of Linux 4.17. The release comes a couple of months after the first release candidate, and in his message Torvalds also talks about version 5.0 of the Linux kernel. Having previously said that Linux kernel v5.0 “should be meaningless,” he said that this next major numerical milestone will come around “in the not too distance future.” For now, though, it’s version 4.17 — or Merciless Moray, if you prefer — that’s of interest. Linux kernel 4.17 is not a major release, and Torvalds announced it without much fanfare. “So this last week was pretty calm, even if the pattern of most of the stuff coming in on a Friday made it feel less so as the weekend approached. And while I would have liked even less changes, I really didn’t


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Microsoft promises to keep GitHub independent and open

Microsoft today announced its plans to acquire GitHub for $7.5 billion in stock. Unsurprisingly, that sent a few shock waves through the developer community, which still often eyes Microsoft with considerable unease. During a conference call this morning, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, incoming GitHub CEO (and Xamarin founder) Nat Friedman and GitHub co-founder and outgoing CEO Chris Wanstrath laid out the plans for GitHub’s future under Microsoft.
The core message everybody on today’s call stressed was that GitHub will continue to operate as an independent company. That’s very much the approach Microsoft took with its acquisition of LinkedIn, but to some degree, it’s also an admission that Microsoft is aware of its reputation among many of the developers who call GitHub their home. GitHub will remain an open platform that any developer can plug into and extend, Microsoft promises. It’ll support any cloud and any device.
Unsurprisingly, while the core of GitHub won’t


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Hello, GitHub

The Octocat is out of the bag: GitHub is joining Microsoft and I will become the new CEO when the deal closes later this year. I’m confident that this change will be great for GitHub and developers around the world, and I wanted to take the opportunity to introduce myself.

Who am I? My name is Nat and I’ve been a developer since I was six. I’ve been active in open source since the 90s when I discovered Linux.

I was blown away to discover a free operating system that came with an editor, compiler, and debugger—all of the tools you need to be a developer, and all of the source code! It was an incredible opportunity for a teenager in a small town in Virginia to learn from the best developers in the world. I spent 15 years working with Linux and founded a couple of open source companies. My first


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The next version of macOS is macOS Mojave

Apple isn’t done with macOS just yet. The company presented the next version of macOS at the WWDC developer conference. With macOS Mojave, Apple is leaving the mountain metaphors behind.
“Today we’re excited to take Mac a huge leap forward,” Apple CEO Tim Cook said.
Apple’s senior vice president of Software Engineering Craig Federighi started with dark mode. With a single setting, you can invert the colors of everything. Even the background of the Finder, Calendar or Photos is black, not just the Dock or menubar. Apple had to redo all the buttons and color schemed across the operating system. If you find white documents too aggressive, dark mode is for you.
With the next version of macOS, the wallpaper and desktop will adapt depending on the time of they day, from morning to afternoon and night. On the desktop, macOS can automatically stack all your documents in the Desktop folder by format.
In


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The new Gmail will roll out to all users next month

Google today announced that the new version of Gmail will launch into general availability and become available to all G Suite users next month. The exact date remains up in the air but my guess is that it’ll be sooner than later.
The new Gmail offers features like message snoozing, attachment previews, a sidebar for both Google apps like Calendar and third-party services like Trello, offline support, confidential messages that self-destruct after a set time, and more. It’s also the only edition of Gmail that currently allows you to try out Smart Compose, which tries to complete your sentences for you.
Here is what the rollout will look like for G Suite users. Google didn’t detail what the plan for regular users will look like, but if you’re not a G Suite user, you can already try the new Gmail today anyway and chances are stragglers will also get switched over to


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The Zen of Chatbot State

When Facebook Messenger, Slack, and Skype announced availability of chat APIs last year, we were excited to bring our Hello Hipmunk travel assistant – which was previously only available through email – to the users of these messaging products. However, as we started adding support for these new APIs to our chatbot engine, we quickly realized that there were challenges unique to building a great experience on modern chat platforms. Not only did we have to contend with users interacting via text message, as in email, but now we wanted to support interactive button inputs as well. We found ourselves tackling a fundamental, but relatively unexplored problem: What is the best way to model a conversation?
The transition from email-based virtual assistant to chatbot posed questions. How should our chatbot handle short messages of half-formed ideas? How should we expose buttons to add useful and meaningful interactivity with our search results?


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