Winds 2.0: It’s Time to Revive RSS

I love using RSS to follow the programming and tech news I care about. Unfortunately, the number of sites supporting RSS has been in rapid decline over the last few years. The reader ecosystem is slowly degrading as well. Facebook and Twitter’s dominance is now delivering its final blow to the open standard of RSS.
It’s time to turn the tide. Stream is releasing Winds 2.0, an open-source Podcast & RSS Reader. You can download Winds here or head over to Github for the code.

Many power users of RSS are developers, designers and journalists. Together, we hope to tip the balance and #ReviveRSS. With the help of the community we can build an RSS experience that’s polished, bug free and popular enough to convince publications to improve their support for open standards and RSS.
Winds is not perfect yet, we’re working on it though and with your help we might just manage


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Computer History Museum Makes Eudora Email Client Source Code Available

Mountain View, May 22, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Computer History Museum (CHM), the world’s leading institution exploring the history of computing and its impact on the human experience, today announced the public release and long-term preservation of the Eudora source code, one of the early successful email clients, as part of its Center for Software History’s Historical Source Code. The release comes after a five-year negotiation with Qualcomm. The first version of Eudora was created in the 1980s by Steve Dorner who was working at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. It took Dorner over a year to create the first version of Eudora, which had 50,000 lines of C code and ran only on the Apple Macintosh. In 1991, Qualcomm licensed Eudora from the University of Illinois and distributed it free of charge. Qualcomm later released Eudora as a consumer product in 1993, and it quickly gained popularity. Available


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The end of an era: Saying goodbye to search.cpan.org

It’s with sad hearts that we are announcing that search.cpan.org will be retired on the 25th of June 2018.Graham Barr originally wrote the site nearly 20 years ago — it first went live in early 1999 — and it quickly became an invaluable resource for Perl developers around the world.The ability to search CPAN (Comprehensive Perl Archive Network) and read Perl module documentation online helped spark many developers interest in Perl and helped to build the Perl community.The site was originally hosted by Washington University in St. Louis on a single Solaris box. For his work on search.cpan.org, Graham won a White Camel award in 2002.The site was later moved to the Perl NOC. US mirrors were hosted by YellowBot and Phyber and a European mirror has been hosted by digital craftsmen for the last 10 years. These amazing people and companies helped make the site a success.In recent years maintenance


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Faster Audio Decoding and Encoding Coming To Ogg and FLAC

FLAC and Ogg now have faster audio encoding and decoding capabilities thanks to recent code improvements. An anonymous reader writes: Robert Kausch of the fre:ac audio converter project informed news outlet Phoronix about recent changes he has made to FLAC and Ogg for bolstering faster performance. Kausch says he updated the CRC checks within FLAC and Ogg to a faster algorithm and those patches have now been accepted upstream. The Ogg and FLAC updates were merged this week for using the optimized CRC algorithm. As a result of this, encoding and decoding FLAC is now 5 percent faster, while encoding and decoding Ogg FLAC is 10 percent and 15 percent faster, respectively. Opus sees about one percent faster decoding, while Vorbis does decoding at two percent faster pace.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/8wRu9ECX3eU/faster-audio-decoding-and-encoding-coming-to-ogg-and-flac

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Slack adds Actions feature, highlights dev community growth

Slack users can now create action points directly from a message post in the app with the introduction today of a new Actions feature. Announced as Slack kicked off its first Spec developer conference in San Francisco on Tuesday, Actions deepens integration with third-party apps such as project management tool Asana and issue-tracking app Jira. [ Further reading: 10 tips for preventing Slack burnout ]An Asana task can be created by clicking on the context menu in the right hand corner of a Slack message, for instance; it will capture relevant data directly from the message menu such as due date, what needs to be done and the project involved.To read this article in full, please click here


Original URL: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3273710/collaboration/slack-adds-actions-feature-highlights-dev-community-growth.html#tk.rss_all

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Spectre and Meltdown variant 4: Microsoft, Google and Intel reveal new Speculative Store Bypass chip vulnerability

Just when you thought you could forget about the Spectre and Meltdown chip vulnerabilities, yet another variant has been discovered. Known as Speculative Store Bypass, the vulnerability affects chips from AMD and Intel, as well as Power 8, Power 9 and System z processors. The vulnerability has been assigned CVE-2018-3639, and successful exploitation would mean that an attacker could gain access to data. The attack can be carried out through a “language-based runtime environment” such as JavaScript. Some patches exist while others are in development, and they include the same performance hit associated with patches for the previous vulnerabilities. See… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2018/05/22/speculative-store-bypass-variant-4-vulnerability/

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A Docker Image in Less Than 1000 Bytes

Here it is (base64-encoded):
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
How I Got There
A colleague of mine showed me a Docker image he was using to test Kubernetes clusters. It did nothing, just starts up as a pod and sits there until you kill it.
‘Look, it’s only 700kb! Really quick to download!’
This got me wondering what the smallest Docker image I could create was.
I wanted one I could base64 encode and send ‘anywhere’ with a cut and paste.
Since a Docker image is just a tar file, and a tar file is ‘just’ a file, this should be quite possible.
A Tiny Binary
The first thing I needed was a tiny Linux binary that does nothing.
There’s some prior art here, a couple of fantastic and instructive articles on creating small executables, which are well worth reading:
Smallest x86 ELF Hello World
A Whirlwind Tutorial on Creating Really Teensy ELF Executables for Linux
I didn’t want a ‘Hello World’, but a program that just


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