Comcast’s mesh Wi-Fi system, xFi Pods, launches nationwide

Comcast today is officially launching its own Wi-Fi extender devices called xFi Pods that help to address problems with weak Wi-Fi signals in parts of a customer’s home due to things like the use of building materials that disrupt signals, or even just the home’s design. The launch follows Comcast’s announcement last year that it was investing in the mesh router maker Plume, which offers plug-in “pods” that help extend Wi-Fi signals.
The company said that it would launch its own xFi pods that pair with Comcast’s gateways to its own customers as a result of that deal.
Those pods were initially available in select markets, including Boston, Chicago and Denver, ahead of today’s nationwide launch.
The pods themselves are hexagon-shopped devices that plug in to any electrical outlet in the home, and then pair with Comcast’s xFi Wireless Gateway or the xFi Advanced Gateway to help Wi-Fi signals extend to the hard-to-reach areas


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OpenStack spins out its Zuul open source CI/CD platform

There are few open-source projects as complex as OpenStack, which essentially provides large companies with all the tools to run the equivalent of the core AWS services in their own data centers. To build OpenStack’s various systems the team also had to develop some of its own DevOps tools, and, in 2012, that meant developing Zuul, an open-source continuous integration and delivery (CI/CD) platform. Now, with the release of Zuul v3, the team decided to decouple Zuul from OpenStack and run it as an independent project. It’s not quite leaving the OpenStack ecosystem, though, as it will still be hosted by the OpenStack Foundation.
Now all of that may seem a bit complicated, but at this point, the OpenStack Foundation is simply the home of OpenStack and other related infrastructure projects. The first one of those was obviously OpenStack itself, followed by the Kata Containers project late last year. Zuul is simply


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Extracting SSH Private Keys from Windows 10 ssh-agent

Table of Contents
Intro Using OpenSSH in Windows 10 Monitoring SSH Agent Testing Registry Values Unprotecting the Key Figuring out Binary Format Putting it all together This weekend I installed the Windows 10 Spring Update, and was pretty excited to start playing with the new, builtin OpenSSH tools.
Using OpenSSH natively in Windows is awesome since Windows admins no longer need to use Putty and PPK formatted keys. I started poking around and reading up more on what features were supported, and was pleasantly surprised to see ssh-agent.exe is included.
I found some references to using the new Windows ssh-agent in this MSDN article, and this part immediately grabbed my attention:

I’ve had some good fun in the past with hijacking SSH-agents, so I decided to start looking to see how Windows is “securely” storing your private keys with this new service.
I’ll outline in this post my methodology and steps to figuring it


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PostgreSQL 11 Partitioning Improvements

PostgreSQL 11, due to be released later this year, comes with a bunch of
improvements for the declarative partitioning feature that was introduced in
version 10. Here’s a quick look at what’s on the menu.

Partitioned Tables in Postgres

Postgres 10 introduced natively partitioned tables in core PostgreSQL. With this
feature, you can shard a table into multiple child tables. The parent table itself
contains no rows, but serves as a “virtual” table into which you can insert rows
and query from. Combining this with other PostgreSQL features, you can have
child tables on separate disks (tablespaces)
or even other servers
(FDW).

Checkout the Postgres
docs for
more on partitioned tables.

PostgreSQL 11 brings all around improvements to partitioning functionality. You
can get your hands dirty with the new features on the first beta which should
be coming out in a few weeks. Or compile it from the latest snapshot,
like we did.

So without further ado, here is the list you came here for:

1. Update Moves Rows


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Sony shrinks its Digital Paper tablet down to a more manageable 10 inches

I had a great time last year with Sony’s catchily named DPT-RP1, an e-paper tablet that’s perfect for reading PDFs and other big documents, but one of my main issues was simply how big the thing is. Light and thin but 13 inches across, the tablet was just unwieldy. Heeding (I assume) my advice, Sony is putting out a smaller version and I can’t wait to try it out.
At the time, I was comparing the RP1 with the reMarkable, a crowdfunded rival that offers fantastic writing ability but isn’t without its flaws. Watch this great video I made:

The 10-inch DPT-CP1 has a couple small differences from its larger sibling. The screen has a slightly lower resolution but should be the same PPI — it’s more of a cutout of the original screen than a miniaturization. And it’s considerably lighter: 240 grams to the 13-inch version’s 350. Considering the latter already


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Opa, an open source, general-purpose policy engine

README.md

The Open Policy Agent (OPA) is an open source, general-purpose policy engine that enables unified, context-aware policy enforcement across the entire stack.
OPA is hosted by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) as a sandbox level project. If you are an organization that wants to help shape the evolution of technologies that are container-packaged, dynamically-scheduled and microservices-oriented, consider joining the CNCF. For details read the CNCF announcement.
Want to learn more about OPA?
Want to get OPA?
Want to integrate OPA?
Want to contribute to OPA?
How does OPA work?
OPA gives you a high-level declarative language to author and enforce policies
across your stack.
With OPA, you define rules that govern how your system should behave. These
rules exist to answer questions like:
Can user X call operation Y on resource Z?
What clusters should workload W be deployed to?
What tags must be set on resource R before it’s created?
You integrate services with OPA so that


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