How to scrape anything on the web and not get caught

This article will be just a quick one. It’s a few line of code recipe on how
to mitigate IP restrictions and WAFs when crawling the web. If you’re
reading this you probably already already tried web scraping. It’s all
easy breezy until one day someone managing the website you’re harvesting
data from realizes what happens and blocks your IP. If you’re running your
scrappers in an automated way you’ll start seeing them failing miserably.
You’ll probably want to solve this problem fast, before any of precious
data slips through your fingers.Sa hello to proxiesWhile it might be tempting to use one of paid providers of such
services it isn’t that hard to craft a home baked solution that will
cost you no money. This is thanks to an awesome project
scrapy-rotating-proxies.Just add it to your project like it is described in
the documentation:# settings.py

# …

ROTATING_PROXY_LIST = [
‘proxy1.com:8000’,
‘proxy2.com:8031’,
# …
]

ROTATING_PROXY_LIST_PATH = ‘proxies.txt’

# …So, where to get this proxies.txt list


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/gDiD6WkSaoc/

Original article

“Drupalgeddon2” touches off arms race to mass-exploit powerful Web servers

Attackers are mass-exploiting a recently fixed vulnerability in the Drupal content management system that allows them to take complete control of powerful website servers, researchers from multiple security companies are warning.
At least three different attack groups are exploiting “Drupalgeddon2,” the name given to an extremely critical vulnerability Drupal maintainers patched in late March, researchers with Netlab 360 said Friday. Formally indexed as CVE- 2018-7600, Drupalgeddon2 makes it easy for anyone on the Internet to take complete control of vulnerable servers simply by accessing a URL and injecting publicly available exploit code. Exploits allow attackers to run code of their choice without having to have an account of any type on a vulnerable website. The remote-code vulnerability harkens back to a 2014 Drupal vulnerability that also made it easy to commandeer vulnerable servers.
Drupalgeddon2 “is under active attack, and every Drupal site behind our network is being probed constantly from multiple IP


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/b45ISHRD3l8/

Original article

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