ReactOS 0.4.8 Released

jeditobe shares a report from OSNews: With software specifically leaving NT5 behind, ReactOS is expanding its target to support NT6+ (Vista, Windows 8, Windows 10) software. Colin, Giannis and Mark are creating the needed logic in NTDLL and LDR for this purpose. Giannis has finished the side-by-side support and the implicit activation context, Colin has changed Kernel32 to accept software made for NT6+, and Mark keeps working on the shim compatibility layer. Although in a really greenish and experimental state, the new additions in 0.4.8 should start helping several software pieces created for Vista and upwards to start working in ReactOS. Microsoft coined the term backwards compatibility, ReactOS the forward compatibility one. Slashdot reader jeditobe adds: “A new tool similar to DrWatson32 has been created by Mark and added to 0.4.8, so now any application crashing will create a log file on the desktop. This crash dump details the list


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/sWZioXLlH40/reactos-048-released

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Linux 4.17 Kernel Offers Better Intel Power-Savings While Dropping Old CPUs

An anonymous reader writes: Linus Torvalds has released Linux 4.17-rc1. This kernel comes with a significant amount of new capabilities as outlined by the Linux 4.17 feature overview. Among the new features are AMDGPU WattMan support, Intel HDCP support, Vega 12 GPU enablement, NVIDIA Xavier SoC support, removal of obsolete CPU architectures, and even better support for the original Macintosh PowerBook 100 series. Phoronix testing has also revealed measurable power savings improvements and better power efficiency on Intel hardware. The kernel is expected to be stabilized by June.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/nzSWNpN3eAE/linux-417-kernel-offers-better-intel-power-savings-while-dropping-old-cpus

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Microsoft built its own custom Linux kernel for its new IoT service

At a small press event in San Francisco, Microsoft today announced the launch of a secure end-to-end IoT product that focuses on microcontroller-based devices — the kind of devices that use tiny and relatively low-powered microcontrollers (MCUs) for basic control or connectivity features. Typically, these kinds of devices, which could be anything from a toy to a household gadget or an industrial application, don’t often get updated and hence, security often suffers.
At the core of Azure Sphere is a new class of certified MCUs. As Microsoft president and chief legal officer Brad Smith stressed in today’s announcement, Microsoft will license these new Azure Sphere chips for free, in hopes to jump-start the Azure Sphere ecosystem.
Because it’s hard to secure a device you can’t update or get telemetry from, it’s no surprise that these devices will feature built-in connectivity. And with that connectivity, these devices can also connect to the Azure


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/lJZWKOharJM/

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Microsoft unveils secure MCU platform with a Linux-based OS

Microsoft announced an “Azure Sphere” architecture for high-end microcontrollers that run a Linux-based Azure Sphere OS and include end-to-end Microsoft security technologies and a cloud service. Products based on a MediaTek MT3620 Azure Sphere chip are due by year’s end. Just when Google has begun to experiment with leaving Linux behind with its Fuchsia OS […]


Original URL: http://linuxgizmos.com/microsoft-unveils-secure-mcu-platform-with-a-linux-based-os/

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Apache Subversion 1.10 Release Notes

Improved path-based authorization

Subversion 1.10 provides a new implementation of path-based authorization
with improved performance and wildcard support.

Existing authz rules come in two flavours, repository-specific and global:

[repos:/path]
[/path]
In these rules, /path is always matched literally.

The new authz rule parser supports two new forms for rules which may contain
wildcards in the path element:

[:glob:repos:/path]
[:glob:/path]

The following wildcard syntax elements are supported in glob rules:
* matches a single (exactly one), arbitrary path segment
** matches an arbitrary number of path segments, separated by a forward slash: /
Classic wildcard patterns such as *foo*.bar work as expected, including escaping of special
characters with a backslash:
All wildcards apply to full path segments only, i.e. * never matches /, except for the
case where /**/ matches zero or more path segments. For example, /*/**/* will match any path
which contains at least 2 segments and is equivalent to /**/*/* as well


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/jHppxAoCrrw/1.10.html

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You Can’t Do Data Science in a GUI

This Domino Data Science Field Note blog post provides highlights of Hadley Wickham’s ACM Chicago talk, “You Can’t Do Data Science in a GUI”. In his talk, Wickham advocates that, unlike a GUI, using code provides reproducibility, data provenance, and the ability to track changes so that data scientists have the ability to see how the data analysis has evolved. As the creator of ggplot2, it is not a surprise that Wickham also advocates the use of visualizations and models together to help data scientists find the real signals within their data. This blog post also provides clips from the original video and follows the Creative Commons license affiliated with the original video recording.

Hadley Wickham, Chief Scientist at RStudio, presented an ACM Chicago talk, “You Can’t Do Data Science in a GUI”, that covered data science work flows and tools. For example, Wickham advocates the use of visualizations and models to


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/-fH3fzcEXdo/

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Linux 4.17-rc1: “We removed more lines than we added”

From: Linus Torvalds
Date: Sun Apr 15 2018 – 21:55:49 EST

So two weeks have passed, and the merge window was pretty normal andis now closed.This does not seem to be shaping up to be a particularly big release,and there seems to be nothing particularly special about it. The mostspecial thing that happened is purely numerology: we’ve passed the sixmillion git objects mark, and that is reason enough to call the nextkernel 5.0. Except I probably won’t, because I don’t want to be toopredictable. The version numbers are meaningless, which should meanthat they don’t even follow silly numerological rules – even if v3.0and v4.0 happened to be at the 2M and 4M mark respectively.But v5.0 will happen some day. And it should be meaningless. You havebeen warned.Anyway, we do have a *few* other things that happened, like Arndgetting rid of a number of architectures that seem to simply notmatter any more. If


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/7Tbulrxa2ks/06654.html

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Teachable raises $4M to create a tool to turn any online class into a true business

Online coursework is exploding across all kinds of verticals and fields of expertise — but those courses inevitably end up on platforms like Udemy, and for Ankur Nagpal, that’s really not a way to build a true business.
That’s why Nagpal started Teachable, a platform for experts that want to create a business around their coursework that helps them build an entire online education suite beyond just platforms like Coursera or Udemy. Niche expertise can be way too valuable for just a simple marketplace like Coursera, Nagpal says, and experts in those areas — even seminars on mindfulness or Feng Shui — should be able to make more than just a few thousand dollars a year off that coursework. Nagpal said the company has raised an additional $4 million in equity from existing investors Accomplice Ventures and AngelList co-founder Naval Ravikant.
“In the past, if you wanted to teach courses, you could either


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/M_HqmQk9FMQ/

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