New – Encryption of Data in Transit for Amazon EFS

Amazon Elastic File System was designed to be the file system of choice for cloud-native applications that require shared access to file-based storage. We launched EFS in mid-2016 and have added several important features since then including on-premises access via Direct Connect and encryption of data at rest. We have also made EFS available in additional AWS Regions, most recently US West (Northern California). As was the case with EFS itself, these enhancements were made in response to customer feedback, and reflect our desire to serve an ever-widening customer base.
Encryption in Transit Today we are making EFS even more useful with the addition of support for encryption of data in transit. When used in conjunction with the existing support for encryption of data at rest, you now have the ability to protect your stored files using a defense-in-depth security strategy.
In order to make it easy for you to


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Gerbera – A UPnP Media Server That Let’s You Stream Media on Home Network

Gerbera is a feature-rich and powerful UPnP (Universal Plug and Play) media server with a pleasant and intuitive web user interface, which allows users to stream digital media (videos, images, audio etc..) through a…
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Amazon Translate Now Generally Available

Today we’re excited to make Amazon Translate generally available. Late last year at AWS re:Invent my colleague Tara Walker wrote about a preview of a new AI service, Amazon Translate. Starting today you can access Amazon Translate in US East (N. Virginia), US East (Ohio), US West (Oregon), and EU (Ireland) with a 2 million character monthly free tier for the first 12 months and $15 per million characters after that. There are a number of new features available in GA: automatic source language inference, Amazon CloudWatch support, and up to 5000 characters in a single TranslateText call. Let’s take a quick look at the service in general availability.
Amazon Translate New Features
Since Tara’s post already covered the basics of the service I want to point out some of the new features of the service released today. Let’s start with a code sample:
import boto3
translate = boto3.client(“translate”)
resp = translate.translate_text(


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Amazon Transcribe Now Generally Available

At AWS re:Invent 2017 we launched Amazon Transcribe in private preview. Today we’re excited to make Amazon Transcribe generally available for all developers. Amazon Transcribe is an automatic speech recognition service (ASR) that makes it easy for developers to add speech to text capabilities to their applications. We’ve iterated on customer feedback in the preview to make a number of enhancements to Amazon Transcribe.
New Amazon Transcribe Features in GA
To start off we’ve made the SampleRate parameter optional which means you only need to know the file type of your media and the input language. We’ve added two new features – the ability to differentiate multiple speakers in the audio to provide more intelligible transcripts (“who spoke when”), and a custom vocabulary to improve the accuracy of speech recognition for product names, industry-specific terminology, or names of individuals. To refresh our memories on how Amazon Transcribe works lets look


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Amazon introduces new private certificate feature

At the Amazon Summit in San Francisco today, the company announced a new cloud service that enables organizations to create and manage private certificates in the cloud.
While the Summit wasn’t chock full of announcements like the annual re:Invent conference, it did offer some new services like the beefing up the AWS Certificate Manager (ACM) with an all-new Private Certificate Authority (PCA). (Amazon does love its acronyms.)
Private certificates let you limit exactly who has access, giving you more control and hence greater security over them. Private certificates are usually confined to a defined group like a company or organization, but up until now it has been rather complex to create them.
As with any good cloud services, the Private Certificate Authority removes a layer of complexity involved in managing them. “ACM Private CA builds on ACM’s existing certificate capabilities to help you easily and securely manage the lifecycle of your private certificates


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AWS Secrets Manager – Store, Distribute, and Rotate Credentials Securely

Today we’re launching AWS Secrets Manager which makes it easy to store and retrieve your secrets via API or the AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) and rotate your credentials with builtin or custom AWS Lambda functions. Managing application secrets like database credentials, passwords, or API Keys is easy when you’re working locally with one machine and one application. As you grow and scale to many distributed microservices it becomes a daunting task to securely store, distribute, rotate, and consume secrets. Previously, customers needed to provision and maintain additional infrastructure solely for secrets management which could incur costs and introduce unneeded complexity into systems.
AWS Secrets Manager

Imagine that I have an application that takes incoming tweets from Twitter and stores them in an Amazon Aurora database. Previously, I would have had to request a username and password from my database administrator and embed those credentials in environment variables or,


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CockroachDB 2.0 released

CockroachDB debuted as the open source database that made it possible to build massive, reliable cloud applications without giving up SQL. Forward-thinking companies adopted it to hide the complexity of dealing with distributed scale, resilience, and consistency problems in the database layer. The promise was simple: keep your apps simple and your pagers silent. Over the last six months, we’ve welcomed Mesosphere as a customer and helped companies like Kindred and Baidu continue to migrate internet-scale workloads onto CockroachDB. We’ve also watched our distributed SQL database enable exciting new use cases, from a blockchain solution for certifying document authenticity to a system of record for tracking simulations that help optimize oil and gas exploration.
Since our 1.0 release, we’ve heard from our users that changes in everything from the countries where they do business to their users’ ever-growing requirements are causing them to rethink how they build and deploy applications. Developers


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