Windows Server 2019 Will Feature Linux and Kubernetes Support

Microsoft announced this week that it will launch the next major release of Windows Server later this year with better support for hybrid workloads, Linux workloads, and hyper-converged infrastructure. From a report: This release will succeed Windows Server 2016, which was made generally available in October 2016. While Microsoft moved to twice-yearly updates for Windows Server starting last year, the company bundles those changes into a long-term servicing channel once every two or three years for administrators who prefer less frequent releases. Those companies that haven’t moved over to the semi-annual channel will get their first taste of Windows Server’s Linux and Kubernetes support, which are currently in beta.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/03wPlvaX_P8/windows-server-2019-will-feature-linux-and-kubernetes-support

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Alphabet’s Outline lets you build your own VPN

Alphabet’s cybersecurity division Jigsaw released an interesting new project called Outline. If I simplify things quite a lot, it lets anyone create and run a VPN server on DigitalOcean, and then grant your team access to this server.
I played a bit with Outline and it’s an interesting product. There are two components, a managing app and a client. Let’s start with the manager.
Right now, the manager is available on Windows and Linux, with a macOS version coming soon. It’s an Electron app so it feels like using a web app. By default, Outline recommends that you use DigitalOcean, a well-known cloud hosting provider.
You can also create your VPN server on another server, but that’s not really the point of Outline. Outline is all about making it as easy as possible to run your own server. Otherwise you’d already be using Algo VPN or Streisand.
If you choose DigitalOcean, the app opens


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/bTr9FqA9Ei8/

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Facebook Gave Data About 57 Billion Friendships To Academic

Before Facebook suspended Aleksandr Kogan from its platform for the data harvesting “scam” at the centre of the unfolding Cambridge Analytica scandal, the social media company enjoyed a close enough relationship with the researcher that it provided him with an anonymised, aggregate dataset of 57bn Facebook friendships. From a report: Facebook provided the dataset of “every friendship formed in 2011 in every country in the world at the national aggregate level” to Kogan’s University of Cambridge laboratory for a study on international friendships published in Personality and Individual Differences in 2015. Two Facebook employees were named as co-authors of the study, alongside researchers from Cambridge, Harvard and the University of California, Berkeley. Kogan was publishing under the name Aleksandr Spectre at the time. A University of Cambridge press release on the study’s publication noted that the paper was “the first output of ongoing research collaborations between Spectre’s lab in Cambridge


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/i6xRVDkc3U8/facebook-gave-data-about-57-billion-friendships-to-academic

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EFS File Sync – Faster File Transfer To Amazon EFS File Systems

We launched EFS File Sync a few days before AWS re:Invent 2017 and I finally have time to tell you about it!
If you need to move a large collection of files from an on-premises or in-cloud file system to Amazon Elastic File System, this tool is for you. Simple, single-threaded command line tools such as cp and rsync predate the cloud and cannot deliver the throughput required to move massive amounts of data from place to place. These tools are generally used as building blocks, often within scripts that take care of scheduling, orchestration, and network security.
Secure & Parallel EFS File Sync uses a secure, highly parallel data transfer mechanism that can run up to 5 times faster than the tools I mentioned above. It is available as an agent that runs within VMware ESXi or on an EC2 instance, and accesses the source file system via NFS


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AmazonWebServicesBlog/~3/Xl7asltQ9-A/

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Microsoft begins push for Windows Server 2019

Microsoft this week released the first preview of Windows Server 2019, the next iteration of its enterprise-standard server software and announced that the final code would ship in the second half of his year.Licensing costs will likely go up for Server 2019, Microsoft added.The Server 2019 early look is available now to participants in Windows Insider, the preview program Microsoft established prior to Windows 10’s launch and expanded in June 2017 to include Windows Server. Microsoft has tagged the beta with the build number 17623.[ Related: Meet Project Honolulu, Microsoft’s new Windows Server management GUI ]Windows Server 2019’s beta, the general window of release, even its nameplate, were not unexpected. Microsoft signaled each when last year it conformed Server’s development and release cadence to that of the client versions of Windows and Office.To read this article in full, please click here


Original URL: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3265061/microsoft-windows/microsoft-begins-push-for-windows-server-2019.html#tk.rss_all

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Creating a pie chart using Rough.js and D3.js

In this simple tutorial, I want to show you how to make a hand-drawn pie chart using the Rough.js and D3.js libs. Besides, you can use Rough.js to draw other geometric figures, maps (using D3.js) in sketch style.
Getting started
To follow this tutorial you should have the basic fundamentals of the command line, Javascript, Canvas, D3.js and be able to run a simple server.
Creating a new project
Let’s create an empty folder using the following command:

mkdir roughjs-chart-tutorial && cd roughjs-chart-tutorial

We already inside this folder. All stuff we will build in the index.html file. We can create it using the next command:

In this tutorial, we will reuse Canvas Pie example from bl.ocks.org and make it with sketchy-style using Rough.js. The original pie chart looks like:
Initial pie-chart. It built using only D3.jsAll you need to take this example and copy whole code to index.html and include Rough.js library. Just add the next line after d3.js library:

src=”https://rawgit.com/pshihn/rough/master/dist/rough.min.js”>

After including, create data.tsv file in the project folder


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/KygXe-04iVk/

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Dejavu – Web UI for Elasticsearch

README.md

Dejavu: Intro
Featuresa. Filter Viewsb. Modern UI Elementsc. Realtime Data Updatesd. Importing JSON or CSV Data
Comparison
Roadmap
Build Locally / Contributing
Get Dejavua. Docker Installationb. Hosted Alternatives
1. Dejavu Intro
dejavu is the missing web UI for Elasticsearch. Existing web UIs leave much to be desired or are built with server side page rendering techniques (I am looking at you, Kibana).
Thus started the journey of dejavu, with a goal to build a modern Web UI (no page reloads, infinite scroll, filtered views, realtime updates) with 100% client side rendering. It is available today as a hosted app, chrome extension and as a docker image.
Starting version 1.0.0, dejavu is the only web UI that supports importing data via JSON and CSV files.
2. Features
Filter Views

Sort through the data, find things visually, hide irrelevant data and make sense of all the numbers and dates. Filters work by identifying data mappings from the Elasticsearch index. If


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/r6nlVM2gmu8/dejavu

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