Coursera teams with 5 universities to expand its full masters and bachelors degree programs

 With traditional university programs getting more expensive and competitive, we’re seeing a boom in the number of alternative programs that are taking advantage of the internet and more flexible teaching and learning formats to fill the gap in the market. The latest development comes from Coursera. Today, the online education startup with 31 million students and some 2,700 courses is… Read More


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Kali Linux For WSL Now Available in the Windows Store

You can now download and install Kali Linux via the Windows Store. From a blog post on MSDN: Our community expressed great interest in bringing Kali Linux to WSL in response to a blog post on Kali Linux on WSL. We are happy to officially introduce Kali Linux on WSL.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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WordPress Now Powers 30% of Websites

WordPress now powers 30 percent of the web, according to data from web technology survey firm W3Techs. From a report: This represents a 5 percentage point increase in nearly two and a half years, after WordPress hit the 25 percent mark in November 2015. It’s worth noting here that this figure relates to the entire Web, regardless of whether a website uses a content management system (CMS) or not. If we’re looking at market share, WordPress actually claims 60.2 percent, up from 58.7 percent in November 2015. By comparison, its nearest CMS rival, Joomla, has seen its usage jump from 2.8 percent to 3.1 percent, while Drupal is up from 2.1 percent to 2.2 percent.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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BlackBerry Files Patent Infringement Lawsuit Against Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram

BlackBerry on Tuesday filed patent infringement lawsuit against Facebook, Whatsapp and Instagram in Los Angeles Federal court. In a statement, BlackBerry said: We have a lot of respect for Facebook and the value they’ve placed on messaging capabilities, some of which were invented by BlackBerry. As a cybersecurity and embedded software leader, BlackBerry’s view is that Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp could make great partners in our drive toward a securely connected future, and we continue to hold this door open to them. However, we have a strong claim that Facebook has infringed on our intellectual property, and after several years of dialogue, we also have an obligation to our shareholders to pursue appropriate legal remedies.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


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The Mystery of the Slow Downloads

A few months ago, a complaint started popping up from users downloading or updating our apps: “Geez, your downloads are really slow!”
If you work in support, you probably have a reflexive reaction to a complaint like this. It’s vague. There’s a million possible factors. It’ll probably resolve itself by tomorrow. You hope. Boy do you hope.
Except… we also started noticing it ourselves when we were working from home. When we’d come in to the office, transfers were lightning fast. But at home, it was really, seriously getting hard to get any work done remotely at all.
So, maybe there was something screwy here?
The Video
Before digging in, here’s this story in convenient summarized video form, if you’d prefer!
Now on to the details.
The Test
The Panic “network topology” is actually very simple. The Panic web servers have a single connection to the internet via Cogent. We colocate our own servers, rather than using AWS or


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A new storage engine for PostgreSQL to provide better control over bloat

In the past few years, PostgreSQL has advanced a lot in terms of features, performance, and scalability for many-core systems.  However, one of the problems that many enterprises still complain is that its size increases over time which is commonly referred to as bloat. PostgreSQL has a mechanism known as autovacuum wherein a dedicated process (or set of processes) tries to remove the dead rows from the relation in an attempt to reclaim the space, but it can’t completely reclaim the space in many cases.  In particular, it always creates a new version of a tuple on an update which must eventually be removed by periodic vacuuming or by HOT-pruning, but still in many cases space is never reclaimed completely.  A similar problem occurs for tuples that are deleted. This leads to bloat in the database.  My colleague Robert Haas has discussed some such cases in his blog DO or


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Retweets are Trash

Acouple of months ago, I made a small tweak to my Twitter account that has changed my experience of the platform. It’s calmer. It’s slower. It’s less repetitive, and a little less filled with outrage. All of these improvements came about because I no longer see retweets.When I joined Twitter, in late 2007, it was still a new medium—and a fun one. I felt as though we early users were discovering its potential, and creating its shared language. At its best, Twitter could feel like your “dream community,” as the writer Kathryn Schulz put it, filled with interesting people who were interested in the same things you were.The retweet began as a user convention. People would write “Retweet” (or “RT”) and paste in another person’s post. This was cumbersome, but it also meant those words would go out next to your name and photograph. People were selective about what they


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Why I am excited about RocksDB

TL;DR RocksDB will probably supplant TokuDB as my go-to backend for bigger-than-RAM datasetsA long time ago something amazing happened in database storage engines.  Fractal Trees inventors spun off a company called Tokutek to productify them.The resulting TokuDB storage engine ran rings around all other engines.  Now it did this in part because they smudged the integration a bit; running the Tokutek-packaged TokuDB always massively outperformed a generic TokuDB packaged by Percona or MariaDB because the tweak wasn’t just to the storage layer but also, I believe, to the way MySQL integrated with storage engines?And, roughly at the same time, deep inside Google they combined Log Structured Merge (LSM) Trees with Sorted String Tables (SSTables).Now if you draw FT and LSM on a white-board side-by side and step back and squint they are actually fairly similar.  The dominating thing is that layers are hierarchical – the storage has the same shape


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