HTTP still under attack

Lots of incoming challenges on Twitter from people who think all my sites should be converted from HTTP to HTTPS.
They make three main points:
Google is going to warn people about my site being “not secure.”
Something bad could happen to my pages in transit from a HTTP server to the user’s web browser.
It’s not hard to convert and it doesn’t cost a lot.
I think that covers it. I list them here to prove I’ve been listening and understand what they say, so hopefully someone doesn’t try to explain it to me yet again.
The second reason, something bad could happen — well lots of bad things could happen. I can’t afford to protect against all of them. I wonder if they ever think about the human being who is supposed to do the work? We have lives, and priorities, we must make choices about how we spend time.


Original URL: http://scripting.com/2018/02/23/174914.html

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Stimulus: A modest JavaScript framework for the HTML you already have

Sprinkle your HTML with controller, target, and action attributes:

Greet

Write a compatible controller and watch Stimulus bring it to life:// hello_controller.js
import { Controller } from “stimulus”

export default class extends Controller {
static targets = [ “name”, “output” ]

greet() {
this.outputTarget.textContent =
`Hello, ${this.nameTarget.value}!`
}
}

Current version: 1.0.1 — released February 02, 2018

Stimulus is a JavaScript framework with modest ambitions. It doesn’t seek to take over your entire front-end—in fact, it’s not concerned with rendering HTML at all. Instead, it’s designed to augment your HTML with just enough behavior to make it shine. Stimulus pairs beautifully with Turbolinks to provide a complete solution for fast, compelling applications with a minimal amount of effort.


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A Practical Introduction to Container Terminology

You might think containers seem like a pretty straightforward concept, so why do I need to read about container terminology? In my work as a container technology evangelist, I’ve encountered misuse of container terminology that causes people to stumble on the road to mastering containers. Terms like containers and images are used interchangeably, but there are important conceptual differences. In the world of containers, repository has a different meaning than what you’d expect. Additionally, the landscape for container technologies is larger than just docker. Without a good handle on the terminology, It can be difficult to grasp the key differences between docker and (pick your favorites, CRI-O, rkt, lxc/lxd) or understand what the Open Container Initiative is doing to standardize container technology.

It is deceptively simple to get started with Linux Containers. It takes only a few minutes to install a container engine like docker and run your first commands. Within


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‘Nobody Cares Who Was First, and Nobody Cares Who Copied Who’: Marco Arment on Defending Your App From Copies and Clones

Marco Arment: App developers sometimes ask me what they should do when their features, designs, or entire apps are copied by competitors. Legally, there’s not a lot you can do about it: Copyright protects your icon, images, other creative resources, and source code. You automatically have copyright protection, but it’s easy to evade with minor variations. App stores don’t enforce it easily unless resources have been copied exactly. Trademarks protect names, logos, and slogans. They cover minor variations as well, and app stores enforce trademarks more easily, but they’re costly to register and only apply in narrow areas. Only assholes get patents. They can be a huge PR mistake, and they’re a fool’s errand: even if you get one ($20,000+ later), you can’t afford to use it against any adversary big enough to matter. Don’t be an asshole or a fool. Don’t get software patents. If someone literally copied your


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/2bGFqREGWSg/nobody-cares-who-was-first-and-nobody-cares-who-copied-who-marco-arment-on-defending-your-app-from-copies-and-clones

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MongoDB 3.6.3 is released

MongoDB 3.6.3 is out and is ready for production deployment. This release contains only fixes since 3.6.2, and is a recommended upgrade for all 3.6 users.Fixed in this release:SERVER-32441 3.6 mongod crash on find with index and nested $and/$orSERVER-32473 Error loading history file on first shell usageSERVER-32606 Tailing oplog on secondary fails with CappedPositionLostSERVER-32631 specifying –bind_ip localhost results in error “address already in use”SERVER-32690 Aggregation can trip invariant related to renamed fields optimizationSERVER-33005 Contained $or access planning is incorrect for $elemMatch object, results in invariant failureSERVER-33140 mongodb+srv URI support broken on shell v3.6.2 for Windows3.6 Release Notes | All Issues | Downloads For more information about MongoDB 3.6, read the What’s New in MongoDB 3.6 white paper​Get up to speed on MongoDB 3.6 with the MongoDB 3.6 Online CourseAs always, please let us know of any issues. — The MongoDB Team


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