The Floodgates Are Open – Increased Network Bandwidth for EC2 Instances

I hope that you have configured your AMIs and your current-generation EC2 instances to use the Elastic Network Adapter (ENA) that I told you about back in mid-2016. The ENA gives you high throughput and low latency, while minimizing the load on the host processor. It is designed to work well in the presence of multiple vCPUs, with intelligent packet routing backed up by multiple transmit and receive queues.
Today we are opening up the floodgates and giving you access to more bandwidth in all AWS Regions. Here are the specifics (in each case, the actual bandwidth is dependent on the instance type and size):
EC2 to S3 – Traffic to and from Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) can now take advantage of up to 25 Gbps of bandwidth. Previously, traffic of this type had access to 5 Gbps of bandwidth. This will be of benefit to applications that access


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AmazonWebServicesBlog/~3/qDoMMh1jAg0/

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Netrunner Rolling 2018.01 KDE-focused Manjaro Linux-based operating system is here

There are many Linux-based operating systems out there, but not many I would call great. My absolute favorite is Fedora, as I am a GNOME fan that likes using a distro that focuses on truly free and open source software. Not to mention, it quickly gets many updated packages while also retaining stability. So yeah, Fedora is great. Another great Linux distro? Netrunner Rolling. This Manjaro-based operating system uses KDE Plasma for its desktop environment. As the name implies, it follows a rolling release, meaning it is constantly being updated to fresh packages — no major upgrades needed. It has a… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2018/01/26/netrunner-rolling-2018-kde-linux/

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Your instant Kubernetes cluster

This is a condensed and updated version of my previous tutorial Kubernetes in 10 minutes. I’ve removed just about everything I can so this guide still makes sense. Use it when you want to create a cluster on the cloud or on-premises as fast as possible.

1.0 Pick a host

We will be using Ubuntu 16.04 for this guide so that you can copy/paste all the instructions. Here are several environments where I’ve tested this guide. Just pick where you want to run your hosts.

DigitalOcean
Civo
Packet
Dell quad-core i7 at home
1.1 Provision the machines

You can get away with a single host for testing but I’d recommend at least three so we have a single master and two worker nodes.

Here are some other guidelines:

Pick dual-core hosts with ideally at least 2GB RAM
If you can pick a custom username when provisioning the host then do that rather than root. For example Civo offers an option of


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/BK357RqxcdA/

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