Building Uber’s highest queries-per-second service with Go

In early 2015 we built a microservice that does one thing (and does it really well), geofence lookups. One year later, this service is Uber’s highest queries per second (QPS) service out of the hundreds we run in production. Here’s the story of why we built this service, and how the relatively recent Go programming language helped us build and scale it so fast.

Background
At Uber, a geofence refers to a human-defined geographic area (or polygon in geometry terms) on the Earth’s surface. We use geofences extensively at Uber for geo-based configurations. This is important for showing users which products are available at a given location, defining areas with specific requirements such as airports, and implementing dynamic pricing in neighborhoods where lots of people are requesting rides at the same time.

An example geofence in Colorado.
The first step to retrieve geolocation-based configurations for something like a lat/lon pair from a user’s mobile


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RedHat – Kernel Side-Channel Attacks – CVE-2017-5754 CVE-2017-5753 CVE-2017-5715

Impacted ProductsRed Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Important.The following Red Hat product versions are impacted:Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7Red Hat Atomic HostRed Hat Enterprise MRG 2Red Hat OpenShift Online v2Red Hat OpenShift Online v3Red Hat Virtualization (RHEV-H/RHV-H)Red Hat OpenStack (OSP) 6Red Hat OpenStack (OSP) 7Red Hat OpenStack (OSP) 8Red Hat OpenStack (OSP) 9Red Hat OpenStack (OSP) 10Red Hat OpenStack (OSP) 11Red Hat OpenStack (OSP) 12While Red Hat’s Linux Containers are not directly impacted by kernel issues, their security relies upon the integrity of the host kernel environment. Red Hat recommends that you use the most recent versions of your container images. The Container Health Index, part of the Red Hat Container Catalog, can always be used to verify the security status of Red Hat containers. To protect the privacy of the containers in use,


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CPU Usage Differences After Applying Meltdown Patch at Epic Games

Originally posted by IchabodCraneMD

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How does this affect the console community? Are they separated from these same server issues or is everything combined?

This affect about 99% of the hardware in the world including the consoles, smartphone, tablet, PCs, etc.To explain the Meltdown and Specter’s effect, it’s actually something quite simple to do:You know the processor is basically the “task handler” of everything in your PC/Console/Tablet,etc. right? It runs those & 1 at a super high speed.The thing is that to run those 1 & 0, it has to, technically, store them in a physical way so that it can be passed through to what’s next. As it’s & 1, it’s not encrypted or protected. It’s pure raw data. The encryption and protection are usually done after the data has passed through the processor… by a task handled by the processor (ironically). Now, what they have “found” (which is false. it’s


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Google answers your questions about Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities

The revelations about the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities affecting millions of processors around the world has raised a huge number of questions for many people. While businesses and large organizations are rushing to ensure that their systems — and their data — are protected, the average computer user has been left wondering what on Earth is going on. While there are a lot of very technical write-ups about the implications of the Spectre and Meltdown bugs, as well as explanations of just how the exploit works, the average Joe has been left somewhat in the dark. To try to remedy… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2018/01/06/google-answers-spectre-meltdown-questions/

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Intel Hit With Three Class-Action Lawsuits Over Meltdown and Spectre Bugs

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Intel has been hit with at least three class-action lawsuits over the major processor vulnerabilities revealed this week. Three separate class-action lawsuits have been filed by plaintiffs in California, Oregon and Indiana seeking compensation, with more expected. All three cite the security vulnerability and Intel’s delay in public disclosure from when it was first notified by researchers of the flaws in June. Intel said in a statement it “can confirm it is aware of the class actions but as these proceedings are ongoing, it would be inappropriate to comment.” The plaintiffs also cite the alleged computer slowdown that will be caused by the fixes needed to address the security concerns, which Intel disputes is a major factor. “Contrary to some reports, any performance impacts are workload-dependent, and, for the average computer user, should not be significant and will be mitigated over


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