Best of ArXiv.org for AI, Machine Learning, and Deep Learning – November 2017

In this recurring monthly feature, we filter recent research papers appearing on the arXiv.org preprint server for compelling subjects relating to AI, machine learning and deep learning – from disciplines including statistics, mathematics and computer science – and provide you with a useful “best of” list for the past month. Researchers from all over the world contribute to this repository as a prelude to the peer review process for publication in traditional journals. arXiv contains a veritable treasure trove of learning methods you may use one day in the solution of data science problems. We hope to save you some time by picking out articles that represent the most promise for the typical data scientist. The articles listed below represent a fraction of all articles appearing on the preprint server. They are listed in no particular order with a link to each paper along with a brief overview. Consider that


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Kodi comes full circle, now available for Xbox One

Kodi started life as XBMC (XBox Media Center) and was designed to run on Microsoft’s original Xbox. The software has since then enjoyed a meteoric — and somewhat controversial — rise, and is now available for most platforms, including Windows, Mac, Android, and Linux. One platform it was missing from was the latest generation of Microsoft’s console, the Xbox One, but that oversight has finally been corrected. You can, from today, install Kodi on both that console and the Xbox One S. Although there is a catch. SEE ALSO: Kodi warns users to update their software and addons for safer… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: https://betanews.com/2017/12/29/kodi-comes-full-circle-now-available-for-xbox-one/

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How to Disable SSH Root Login in Linux

The root account is often the most targeted account by crackers via SSH under Linux. An enabled SSH root account on a Linux server exposed to a network or, worse, exposed in Internet can…
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HTML 5.2 is done, HTML 5.3 is coming

Today W3C releases HTML 5.2. This is the second revision of HTML5, following last year’s HTML 5.1 Recommendation. In 2014 we expressed a goal to produce a revision roughly every year; HTML 5.2 is a continuation of that commitment.
This Recommendation like its predecessor provides an updated stable guide to what is HTML. In the past year there has been a significant cleanup of the specification. We have introduced some new features, and removed things that are no longer part of the modern Web Platform, or that never achieved broad interoperability. As always we have also fixed bugs in the specification, making sure it adapts to the changing reality of the Web.
Many of the features added integrate other work done in W3C. The Payment Request API promises to make commerce on the Web far easier, reducing the risks of making a mistake or being caught by an unscrupulous operator. New security


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Linux 4.15 rc5

Linus Torvalds: This (shortened) week ended up being fairly normal for rc5, with the exception of the ongoing merging of the x86 low-level prep for kernel page table isolation that continues and is noticeable.


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ESP8266 ePaper WiFi Display Kit Runs for Months on a Charge

In my humble opinion—as I’ve mentioned elsewhere—ePaper is really an amazing display technology that has never really burst onto the mainstream. ePaper is incredibly energy efficient, requiring power only to change the display, the refresh rate is atrocious compared to television or smartphones, but seems to have been relegated to dedicated e-readers and the odd smartwatch. The natural outlet then would be makers and hobbyists, but options are less numerous than most other display methods.
The other market I could see for this type of device is as a static display, such as in office meeting rooms, or for weather and other stats which needs to only be updated intermittently. You can try to hack something together yourself, but the 2.9″ ESPaper Plus Kit has everything you need to get started with your semi-static display, including an ESP8266 WiFi module.

This means that your display can grab the info it needs over


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The Docker Bench for Security

README.md

The Docker Bench for Security is a script that checks for dozens of common
best-practices around deploying Docker containers in production. The tests are
all automated, and are inspired by the CIS Docker Community Edition Benchmark v1.1.0.
We are releasing this as a follow-up to our Understanding Docker Security and Best Practices
blog post.
We are making this available as an open-source utility so the Docker community
can have an easy way to self-assess their hosts and docker containers against
this benchmark.
Running Docker Bench for Security
We packaged docker bench as a small container for your convenience. Note that
this container is being run with a lot of privilege — sharing the host’s
filesystem, pid and network namespaces, due to portions of the benchmark
applying to the running host. Don’t forget to adjust the shared volumes
according to your operating system, for example it might not use systemd.
The easiest way to run your hosts against the Docker Bench


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Gittup, a linux distro on top of git

A new linux distribution!
This is an entire(-ish) linux distribution in git. Everything is built with tup. That’s why it’s called gittup.

How it works
A linux distribution is just a collection of packages. Each package has a development history:
For example, the green tree might correspond to Linus’ kernel tree. Your typical linux distribution will select particular versions of the packages and put them all together. As a user you end up with something like this:
With gittup.org, you get the whole development history (where applicable) as part of the standard distribution. As a user you get this:
All of these git projects become submodules of the gittup.git repository. The extra yellow/purple/orange nodes correspond to the gittup branch that I maintain at gittup.org. This mostly includes the changes to support tup, which are needed to make configuration changes and bisection across the entire distribution more practical. Generally what I do is:
Add Tupfiles in place of


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Eelo: Gaël Duval’s Open Source, Privacy Respecting Android Phone Clone

The man behind the first user-friendly Linux distribution now seeks to produce a free-as-you-want-it-to-be Android phone that respects user rights.

Are you ready for a new operating system for your Android phone? An operating system that’s totally free and that’s main purpose isn’t to get you to consume? How about an operating system that, although based on Android, brings to the table some of the best aspects of Linux — like (eventually) it’s own repository of apps? Well, get ready, Gaël Duval is working to bring eelo to the table.
If Duval’s name seems familiar to you, it should. He’s the guy who in 1998 founded Mandrake, the distro that brought ease-of-use to the Linux table long before there was a Ubuntu. Mandrake made installing Linux easy in an age when you had to be something akin to a rocket scientist to get Linux up and running. It also brought graphical point


Original URL: http://fossforce.com/2017/12/eelo-gael-duvals-open-source-privacy-respecting-android-clone/

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