Building a r/place in a weekend

On Friday I accepted a challenge to clone Reddit’s /r/place in a weekend. And I did it, and its live, and its amazing:

Being able to build this in a weekend isn’t genius. Its possible because programming is made up of 2 activities:

Making decisions (95%)
Typing (5%)
Reddit wrote up a wonderful blog post about how they made the original, so lots of the decisions were already made for me. How much load I need to handle, how big to make it, the palette and some of the UI I’m using directly. I didn’t copy reddit’s architecture though, simply because I don’t agree with some of their technical decisions. But the places in which I disagree are all based on decades of my own programming experience, so I still don’t have a lot of decisions left to make.

To be clear, if I was building this for reddit a weekend wouldn’t be enough time.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/JL67jDT4QnQ/

Original article

Anbox – Android in a Box

Installing Anbox on a regular Linux system isn’t hard when you already have the ability
to install snaps. Packaging anbox
within a snap makes it really easy for us to put all necessary bits together and ship it to you!

If your system doesn’t support snaps, then we currently don’t have an easy way for you to install
Anbox. This might change though in the near future.

Installing Anbox is pretty easy as we provide an installer which will install
all necessary things on your system. Please be aware that
the installer requires root privileges on your systems as
it has to install things like additional kernel modules
via DKMS.
You can have a look at the installer script
here.

WARNING: Before you go ahead an install Anbox on your system, please
keep in mind that Anbox currently is ALPHA level software. Not


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/HK0PPQsZUMk/

Original article

Early Macintosh Emulation Comes to the Archive

After offering in-browser emulation of console games, arcade machines, and a range of other home computers, the Internet Archive can now emulate the early models of the Apple Macintosh, the black-and-white, mouse driven computer that radically shifted the future of home computing in 1984.

While there are certainly predecessors to the computer desktop paradigm, the introduction of the Macintosh brought it to a mass market and in the 30 years since, it has been steadily adapted by every major computing platform and operating system.
The first set of emulated Macintosh software is located in this collection. This is a curated presentation of applications, games, and operating systems from 1984-1989.

If you’ve not experienced the original operating system for the Macintosh family of computers, it’s an interesting combination of well-worn conventions in the modern world, along with choices that might seem strange or off-the-mark. At the time the machine was released, however, they landed new ideas in


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/mRsJYQEXdms/

Original article

We Need More Alternatives to Facebook

About 10 years after TVs began to be ubiquitous in American homes, television broadcasting was a staggering financial success. As the head of the Federal Communications Commission observed in a 1961 speech to broadcast executives, the industry’s revenue, more than $1 billion a year, was rising 9 percent annually, even in a recession. The problem, the FCC chairman told the group, was the way the business was making money: not by serving the public interest above all but by airing a lot of dumb shows and “cajoling and offending” commercials. “When television is bad, nothing is worse,” he said.That speech would become known for the pejorative that the FCC chairman, Newton Minow, used to describe TV: he called it “a vast wasteland.” It’s a great line, but there are other reasons to revisit the speech now, about 10 years after the emergence of another communications service—Facebook—that has become ubiquitous in


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/fnAKXnkOvHA/

Original article

CoffeeScript 2.0 Beta Released

CoffeeScript 2 aims to output as much idiomatic ES2015+ syntax as possible with as few breaking changes from CoffeeScript 1.x as possible. Some breaking changes, unfortunately, were unavoidable.

Initial beta release of CoffeeScript 2. No further breaking changes are anticipated.
Destructured objects and arrays now output using ES2015+ syntax whenever possible.
Literate CoffeeScript now has much better support for parsing Markdown, thanks to using Markdown-It to detect Markdown sections rather than just looking at indentation.
Calling a function named get or set now requires parentheses, to disambiguate from the get or set keywords (which are disallowed).
The compiler now requires Node 7.6+, the first version of Node to support asynchronous functions without requiring a flag.
Better handling of default, from, as and * within import and export statements. You can now import or export a member named default and the compiler won’t interpret it as the default keyword.
Fixed a bug where invalid octal escape sequences weren’t


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/Q1s3jjXifSQ/

Original article

Maryland Awards 21 Grants To Prepare ‘Open Source’ Textbooks

“The University System of Maryland has awarded 21 “mini grants” to university faculty to “help them expand open education resources,” reports OpenSource.com. Recipients of the grants are also given time off to prepare courses that use open textbooks, and will receive personalized support and training on effective course design.
An anonymous reader writes:
“Although our faculty view textbooks as essential, some of our students see them as a luxury they cannot afford,” said Community College of Baltimore County President Sandra Kurtinitis. “Having access to open educational resources will provide some financial relief for our students as well as contribute to their academic success.” The cost of textbooks has risen 812% since 1978, the school system said in an announcement, “outpacing even the cost of medical services and new housing. Nationally, students spend an average of $1,200 a year on textbooks.”

The Maryland Open Source Textbook initiative started in 2013 “to provide a


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/BPqWkP4n36s/maryland-awards-21-grants-to-prepare-open-source-textbooks

Original article

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: