Annotation is now a web standard

Many have tried over the years to bring us annotations. The lack of standards has been one of the key things holding these efforts back– a need we highlighted in the first of our 12 original principles back in 2013 and have been working towards ever since.
Yesterday, on February 23, things took a giant leap forward when the W3C, the standards body for the Web, standardized annotation.
Twenty four years after Marc Andreessen first built collaborative annotation into Mosaic and tested it on a few “guinea pigs” before turning it off, annotations have finally become first-class citizens of the web.
From the W3C Web Annotation co-chairs, Rob Sanderson and Tim Cole:
“Many websites already allow comments, but current […] systems rely on unique, usually proprietary technologies chosen and provided by publishers. Notes cannot be shared easily across the Web and comments about a Web page can only be saved and viewed via


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/oj98GXaNnGo/

Original article

Pdftabextract – A set of tools for data mining OCR-processed PDFs

README.md

July 2016 / Feb. 2017, Markus Konrad markus.konrad@wzb.eu / Berlin Social Science Center

Introduction

This repository contains a set of tools written in Python 3 with the aim to extract tabular data from (OCR-processed)
PDF files. Before these files can be processed they need to be converted to XML files in
pdf2xml format. This is very simple — see section below for instructions.

Module overview

After that you can view the extracted text boxes with the
pdf2xml-viewer tool if you like. The pdf2xml format can be loaded and parsed with functions in the common submodule. Lines can be detected in the scanned images using the imgproc module. If the pages are skewed or rotated, this can be detected and fixed with methods from imgproc and functions in textboxes. Lines or text box positions can be clustered in order to detect table columns and rows using the clustering module. When columns and rows were


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/R1bjxNQ4-qg/pdftabextract

Original article

Rolling a virtual DOM

posted Feb 27th 2017, 06:00 am

preramble

One of the tools that I often end up rolling myself is a virtual DOM for re-/generating HTML dynamically. One can hope that spreading the word on their utility will help take some of that weight of my shoulders in the future. A virtual DOM may sound daunting; but we’re aiming for utility, not encoding entire standards to the letter. The focus of this post is laying a simple and extensible foundation, with transaction support thrown in as a hint of what’s to come.

virtual DOM

The main reason you may want to consider the virtual DOM approach is that it allows using the full power of your programming language to modularise, generate and update content dynamically. Templates have their uses, but abusing them to implement dynamic content is one of the worst ideas that came out of Rails. Splitting application logic in two parts/languages, one for


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/Qh40l1ZtIZs/virtual_dom.md

Original article

My 2015 MacBook Pro Retina Exploded

One afternoon as I was lying on my bed browsing the internet, my MacBook Pro suddenly turned off. I turned it back on and within a few seconds there was weird hissing sound, followed by white smoke and thin flames coming out of from the back.I got up and ran with the laptop for the bathroom where I could put it on the ceramic tiles. Not more than ten seconds had passed and already the heat from the bottom of the laptop burnt my middle and ring fingers so badly I had to let it drop.Just in time.There was a bang as I backed away causing the back to pop and smoke kept pouring out. It kept sizzling for a few minutes and then finally it stopped.The house had filled up with smoke everywhere, the acidic stench of melted plastic made my eyes water.After I had opened up all the


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/_VBrFsdx05g/my-2015-macbook-pro-retina-exploded-119ea5ea9d1f

Original article

Mozilla Acquires Pocket and Its More Than 10 Million Users

An anonymous reader quotes a report from Recode: Mozilla, the company behind the Firefox web browser, is buying Pocket, the read-it-later service, for an undisclosed amount. Pocket, which is described by Mozilla as its first strategic acquisition, will continue to operate as a Mozilla subsidiary. Founder Nate Weiner will continue to run Pocket, along with his team of about 25 people. Pocket, previously known as Read It Later, lets users bookmark articles, videos and other content to read or view later on the web or a mobile device. It’s great for things like saving offline copies of web articles to read on plane rides or subway commutes, especially where internet access is sparse. Pocket, which was founded in 2007, has more than 10 million monthly active users, according to a rep. That’s not bad, but suggests it’s still a fairly niche service, especially as big firms like Facebook and Apple


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/HLhKg91rP3E/mozilla-acquires-pocket-and-its-more-than-10-million-users

Original article

How to setup a Linux server on Amazon AWS

This tutorial shows the creation of an Amazon EC2 Linux instance (virtual server) and how to login to that server with SSH from Windows. AWS (Amazon Web Services) is one of the leading cloud server providers worldwide. You can setup a server within a minute using the AWS platform. To get started, AWS provides a special account called “Free tier” where you can use the AWS technology free for one year with some minor restrictions.


Original URL: https://www.howtoforge.com/tutorial/how-to-setup-linux-server-with-aws/

Original article

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: