Open Source Explained in Less Than Three Minutes

Free Code Camp is an organization that teaches people to code. As part of this free training, student coders produce free code needed by nonprofit organizations. Free Code Camp doesn’t accept donations, but you can support them by buying t-shirts, hoodies and audiobooks through their store.

The Video Screening Room

Anthony McDonald, part of Free Code Camp in Phoenix, Arizona, does a nice job of explaining open source in this short video.

If you’re an open source believer, get involved in explaining it on YouTube. If you’re camera shy, that’s fine — just make sure you’re actively supporting the people who are not camera shy. Leave a supportive short comment, subscribe to their channel, tell others about their channel, etc.
The post Open Source Explained in Less Than Three Minutes appeared first on FOSS Force.


Original URL: http://fossforce.com/2016/10/open-source-explained-three-minutes/

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RethinkDB, SageMath, Andreessen-Horowitz, Basecamp and Open Source Software

RethinkDB and sustainable business models
Three weeks ago, I spent the evening of Sept 12, 2016 with Daniel Mewes, who is the lead engineer of RethinkDB (an open source database). I was also supposed to meet with the co-founders, Slava and Michael, but they were too busy fundraising and couldn’t join us. I pestered Daniel the whole evening about what RethinkDB’s business model actually was. Yesterday, on October 6, 2016, RethinkDB shut down.I met with some RethinkDB devs because an investor who runs a fund at the VC firm Andreessen-Horowitz (A16Z) had kindly invited me there to explain my commercialization plans for SageMath, Inc., and RethinkDB is one of the companies that A16Z has invested in. At first, I wasn’t going to take the meeting with A16Z, since I have never met with Venture Capitalists before, and do not intend to raise VC. However, some of my advisors convinced me that


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/MOwxnXrxQHs/rethinkdb-sagemath-andreessen-horowitz.html

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Cockpit – A Powerful Tool to Monitor and Administer Multiple Linux Servers Using a Web Browser

Cockpit is an easy-to-use, lightweight and simple yet powerful remote manager for GNU/Linux servers, it’s an interactive server administration user interface that offers a live Linux session via a web browser. It can run…
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RethinkDB needs a new home

RethinkDB isn’t going anywhere! Tell us how you’re using RethinkDB; we want to showcase this list to open source foundations and make a case for RethinkDB to be adopted. Let’s help RethinkDB find a good home!This form is not managed by the RethinkDB team, but by open source contributors who love RethinkDB!


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React on Rails

Reverb’s main application is a well loved Rails monolith. It serves our API and view level traffic admirably. As we’ve grown, we’ve added more interactive UI elements, and as we did we followed the Rails Way™. We decorated our behavior with jQuery and we left templating to Rails. This approach, yes even in 2016, is still a great choice for a small amount of UI interactivity, but after a couple of years we began to search for something that could help structure our javascript components which were growing in sophistication.During our search we had a few criteria:Plays well with a largely server side rendered applicationCan be mounted in isolationAllows for simple unit testingCould be easily taught to developers of all levelsReact was and is a great fit for our current application. We needed isolated components that could encapsulate complex view logic that could be injected anywhere on the page. We’ve


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/dBh-dug-9ac/react-on-rails-9936283aea07

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Bruce Schneier: We Need To Save the Internet From the Internet of Things

Bruce Schneier, writing for Motherboard:What was new about the Krebs attack was both the massive scale and the particular devices the attackers recruited. Instead of using traditional computers for their botnet, they used CCTV cameras, digital video recorders, home routers, and other embedded computers attached to the internet as part of the Internet of Things. Much has been written about how the IoT is wildly insecure. In fact, the software used to attack Krebs was simple and amateurish. What this attack demonstrates is that the economics of the IoT mean that it will remain insecure unless government steps in to fix the problem. This is a market failure that can’t get fixed on its own.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/EXAW6yAuG9A/bruce-schneier-we-need-to-save-the-internet-from-the-internet-of-things

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