Using Gmail with Mutt

I recently switched to using mutt for email and while setting up mutt to use imap is pretty straightforward, this tutorial will also document some advanced concepts such as encrypting your account password and sending emails from a different From address.

This tutorial assumes that you have some familiarity with using mutt and have installed it with sidebar support (sudo apt-get install mutt-patched for the ubuntu folks) and are comfortable with editing your muttrc.

If you would just like to skip to the end, my mutt configuration file can be found here.

Initial configuration

The first order of business is to enable IMAP support in your gmail account settings. Then, the following lines are required in muttrc.

set imap_user = “victorparmar@gmail.com”
set imap_keepalive = 30
unset imap_passive # allow mutt to open new imap connection automatically
set folder = “imaps://imap.gmail.com”
set spoolfile = “+[Gmail]/All Mail”
set postponed = “+[Gmail]/Drafts”
set header_cache = ~/.mutt/victorparmar/headers
set message_cachedir = ~/.mutt/victorparmar/bodies
set certificate_file = ~/.mutt/certificates
set smtp_url =


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/Y-LJvF0IzAg/gmail-with-mutt

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How does Google know where I am?

You disabled WiFi and GPS, but you still have cellular data turned on. That means that the phone is in communication with the local cell towers. Android uses cell tower geolocation to estimate your current location.

Each cell tower has a set of ID numbers that identifies them to the phones. It broadcasts its identity constantly so that phones can connect to it as they move around. Cellular tower antennas are directional, with each tower serving roughly three different areas; you can think of them as three pie-shaped wedges with the cell tower at the center of the pie. Each of those wedges is a “cell” (which is where the technology got its name.)

Each of the radios serving those cells transmits using a certain amount of power – the closer you are to the tower, the stronger the signal your phone receives, and vice versa. Your phone uses the received


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/lm96Cbvkfgw/how-does-google-know-where-i-am

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Heavy SSD Writes from Firefox

If you are a user of Firefox we have a must-change setting. Today’s modern multi-core processor systems and higher quantities of RAM allow users to open multiple Firefox tabs and windows simultaneously. This can have an unintended effect for those SSDs as session store data can write data constantly to NAND. This issue is being discussed in a STH forum thread where you can follow the discussion.
Observing the Issue: Heavy SSD Writes from Firefox
Purely by chance, I fired up a free copy of SSDLife on two consecutive days where I haven’t really used my workstation for anything other than email and browsing. For those of you unfamiliar with this tool, it simply reports estimated lifetime for the attached SSD and it also shows the amount of data read and written.
In my case, SSDLife notified me that 12GB was written to the SSD in one day. Since I didn’t recall downloading any huge


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/mE0pcM77tII/

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Cryptpad: Zero Knowledge, Collaborative Real Time Editing

CryptPad is the zero knowledge realtime collaborative editor. Encryption carried out in your web browser protects the data from the server, the cloud, and the NSA. The secret encryption key is stored in the URL fragment identifier which is never sent to the server but is available to javascript so by sharing the URL, you give authorization to others who want to participate.

This project uses the CKEditor Visual Editor, CodeMirror, and the ChainPad realtime engine.

How It Works
CryptPad uses a variant of the Operational transformation algorithm which is able to find distributed consensus using a Nakamoto Blockchain, a construct popularized by Bitcoin. This way the algorithm can avoid the need for a central server to resolve Operational Transform Edit Conflicts and without the need for resolving conflicts, the server can be kept unaware of the content which is being edited on the pad.

About

You can read


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Here’s what you should know, and do, about the Yahoo breach

Yahoo’s announcement that state-sponsored hackers stole the details of at least 500 million accounts shocks both through scale — it’s the largest data breach ever — and the potential security implications for users.
That’s because Yahoo, unlike MySpace, LinkedIn and other online services that suffered large breaches in recent years, is an email provider; and email accounts are central to users’ online lives. Not only are email addresses used for private communications, but they serve as recovery points and log-in credentials for accounts on many other websites.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here


Original URL: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3123399/security/heres-what-you-should-know-and-do-about-the-yahoo-breach.html#tk.rss_all

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How to install PHP 5.6 as additional PHP-FPM & FastCGI for ISPConfig 3.1 on Ubuntu 16.04

This tutorial shows how to build PHP 5.6 as a PHP-FPM and a FastCGI version on Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus). Ubuntu 16.04 ships with PHP 7 by default but there are still many websites out there that don’t support PHP 7. This tutorial will show you how to install PHP 5.6 as additional PHP version on Ubuntu 16.04 so that you can switch between both versions for each website individually in ISPConfig.


Original URL: https://www.howtoforge.com/tutorial/how-to-install-php-5-6-on-ubuntu-16-04/

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