IPv6 Support for Amazon S3

As you probably know, every server and device that is connected to the Internet must have a unique IP address. Way back in 1981, RFC 791 (“Internet Protocol”) defined an IP address as a 32-bit entity, with three distinct network and subnet sizes (Classes A, B, and C – essentially large, medium, and small) designed for organizations with requirements for different numbers of IP addresses. In time, this format came to be seen as wasteful and the more flexible CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) format was standardized and put in to use. The 32-bit entity (commonly known as an IPv4 address) has served the world well, but the continued growth of the Internet means that all available IPv4 addresses will ultimately be assigned and put to use.
In order to accommodate this growth and to pave the way for future developments, networks, devices, and service providers are now in the


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