Mapping the World of Music Using Machine Learning: Part 1

Mapping the World of Music Using Machine Learning: Part 1In June 2016 Ravi Mody and Tim Schmeier gave a presentation at the NYC Machine Learning meetup to discuss their work on the data science team at iHeartRadio. This is the first in a three part article complementing the presentation.Music, the Internet, and Machine LearningLike almost everyone who grew up in the 80s/90s, my music discovery followed a familiar pattern: I’d listen to the radio, talk to my friends about what they’re listening to, then buy a CD/tape to play on repeat until everyone around me was sick of it. This worked fine for most people, but as a music lover I’m thankful it seems so foreign today — the internet has completely transformed the way I interact with music. While I still often listen to the radio, I now use my phone to tune into any of thousands of stations from across


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/FEcq7INjNvQ/mapping-the-world-of-music-using-machine-learning-part-1-9a57fa67e366

Original article

React Server

One of the great things about React is its support for server-side rendering, which can make sites show up faster for users and play better with search engine bots. However, when you actually try to use React for server- side rendering, you quickly run into a bunch of practical problems, such as:
How should I load data on the server for my components?
How do I ensure that the client and the server load the same data and generate the same HTML markup?
How do I write code that can be both generated server-side and be part of a single-page application (SPA)?
How should I optimize the delivery of my JavaScript and CSS?
How do I find out about and follow performance best practices?
How do I ensure that my site is streamed to the browser as quickly as humanly possible?
How can I make my app resilient when my backend has high latency spikes?
React-server is a


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/cYubbrn-JnU/

Original article

Automattic open sources Simplenote

At Automattic, we have a saying:

In this spirit, we are announcing today that all of the official Simplenote client apps are now Open Source Software under the GPLv2 license. In addition to the previously open sourced Electron app, you’ll now find the source code for the iOS, Android, and macOS applications on our GitHub page.
We love using Simplenote at Automattic and hope that we can build a great community of contributors from around the world to help make the apps even better.
You can download the source for the apps here:
Happy noting!
– The Simplenote Team


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/A1Fjk8_DL3g/

Original article

PC users install Windows updates, but don’t patch programs

Microsoft is doing its part protecting its users from hackers, but it can’t do everything on its own. According to new figures released by Secunia Research in its Country Reports, covering Q2 2016 for 12 countries, the number of unpatched Windows machines is on the decline. Compared to Q1 this year, when 6.1 percent of systems were unpatched, only 5.4 percent are not up to date now. Same time last year, the figure was 10.3 percent. “The decline in unpatched Windows operating systems is remarkable and encouraging”, notes Kasper Lindgaard, director of Secunia Research at Flexera Software. “It will be interesting to see if… [Continue Reading]


Original URL: http://feeds.betanews.com/~r/bn/~3/6lsV528RSik/

Original article

Microsoft Extends Again Support For Windows 7, 8.1 Skylake-based Devices

Microsoft says it is giving more time to users on Windows 7 and Windows 8.1 devices running sixth generation Intel Skylake chips. Earlier the company had said that it would end support for such systems on July 17, 2018 (before that the end date was July 17, 2017). Today’s announcement further pushes the deadline, giving Windows 7 users till January 14, 2020, and Windows 8.1 users till January 2023. ZDNet adds: Today’s latest change to the Skylake support cut-off dates also applies to Windows Embedded 7, 8 and 8.1 devices. As of this latest change, supported devices running Skylake — here’s the list of PCs that qualify, along with embedded devices — will get all applicable security updates for Windows 7 and 8.1 until the end of support dates for each product. What we don’t really know is why Microsoft made this latest change. Did Intel “fix” Skylake? Did customers,


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/n7V9mXzXXvk/microsoft-extends-again-support-for-windows-7-81-skylake-based-devices

Original article

Arch Linux Is Now Officially Powered by Linux Kernel 4.7, Update Your Systems

Marius Nestor, writing for Softpedia: After a few weeks from its official release, it finally happened, Linux kernel 4.7 has just landed in the stable software repositories of the popular, lightweight and highly customizable Arch Linux operating system. Linux kernel 4.7 is the most stable and advanced kernel branch, and only a few GNU/Linux distributions have adopted since its launch on July 24, 2016. It’s still marked as “mainline” not “stable” or “longterm” on the kernel.org website, which means that it didn’t receive a maintenance update at the moment of writing this article. As for its new features, Linux kernel 4.7 comes with an updated AMDGPU graphics driver with support for AMD Radeon RX 480 GPUs, LoadPin, a brand new security module that ensures all modules loaded by the kernel originate from the same filesystem, and support for upgrading firmware using the EFI “Capsule” mechanism. Linux kernel 4.7 also marks


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/Mq0UH1xFwp0/arch-linux-is-now-officially-powered-by-linux-kernel-47-update-your-systems

Original article

AMD returns to x86 for server reboot as it downgrades ARM

AMD’s move three years ago to rely on ARM for server chips is turning out to be a big mistake.
The company is putting its faith back in x86 chips as it seeks a reboot in servers, a market in which the company was once a big player. Riddled with chip delays and abandoned projects, AMD has downgraded ARM in its server strategy.
Instead of ARM-based servers, AMD is relying again on x86 chips, this time based on the promising Zen architecture, to take market share from Intel.
AMD shipped its first ARM-based Opteron A-series processors early this year after delays. The first server chips based on a custom ARM-based core, called K12 core, could be released next year, an AMD spokesman said, but the company’s server strategy next year is centered on Zen and x86.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here


Original URL: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3106870/computer-hardware/amd-returns-to-x86-for-server-reboot-as-it-downgrades-arm.html#tk.rss_all

Original article

Cracking The Code On Trump Tweets

jIyajbe writes: From Electoral-Vote.com: “A theory has been circulating that the Donald Trump tweets that come from an Android device are from the candidate himself, while the ones that come from an iPhone are the work of his staff. David Robinson, a data scientist who works for Stack Overflow, decided to test the theory. His conclusion: It’s absolutely correct. Robinson used some very sophisticated algorithms to analyze roughly 1,400 tweets from Trump’s timeline, and demonstrated conclusively that the iPhone tweets are substantively different than the Android tweets. The former tend to come later at night, and are vastly more likely to incorporate hashtags, images, and links. The latter tend to come in the morning, and are much more likely to be copied and pasted from other people’s tweets. In terms of word choice, the iPhone tweets tend to be more neutral, with their three most-used phrases being ‘join,’ ‘#trump2016,’ and


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/mfedlN6vQCU/cracking-the-code-on-trump-tweets

Original article

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: