Torrentz Shuts Down, Largest Torrent Meta-Search Engine Says Farewell

Founded in 2003, Torrentz has been a stable factor in the torrent community for over 13 years.
With millions of visitors per day the site grew out to become one of the most visited torrent sites, but today this reign ends, as the popular meta-search engine has announced its shutdown.
A few hours ago and without warning, Torrentz disabled its search functionality. At first sight the main page looks normal but those who try to find links to torrents will notice that they’re no longer there.
Instead, the site is now referring to itself in the past tense, suggesting that after more than a decade the end has arrived.
“Torrentz was a free, fast and powerful meta-search engine combining results from dozens of search engines,” the text reads.
The site’s user are no longer able to login either. Instead, they see the following message: “Torrentz will always love you. Farewell.”
Torrentz.eu says farewell
TorrentFreak was


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