Linux Kernel 4.7 Officially Released

An anonymous Slashdot reader writes: The Linux 4.7 kernel made its official debut today with Linus Torvalds announcing, “after a slight delay due to my travels, I’m back, and 4.7 is out. Despite it being two weeks since rc7, the final patch wasn’t all that big, and much of it is trivial one- and few-liners.” Linux 4.7 ships with open-source AMD Polaris (RX 480) support, Intel Kabylake graphics improvements, new ARM platform/board support, Xbox One Elite Controller support, and a variety of other new features.

Slashdot reader prisoninmate quotes a report from Softpedia:
The biggest new features of Linux kernel 4.7 are support for the recently announced Radeon RX 480 GPUs (Graphic Processing Units) from AMD, which, of course, has been implemented directly into the AMDGPU video driver, a brand-new security module, called LoadPin, that makes sure the modules loaded by the kernel all originate from the same file system, and


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/Fexp2lf0y0k/linux-kernel-47-officially-released

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Swipe Across the Space Bar In Google Keyboard to Move the Cursor

Android: Google’s keyboard packs a ton of simple gestures, but you could miss them if you don’t know they’re there. For example, if you want to move your cursor, swipe left and right across the space bar.Read more…


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Yahoo’s board reportedly agrees to $4.8 billion Verizon bid

 According to reports that are starting to trickle in, Yahoo’s board has accepted the terms of the Verizon offer we reported last week. The core assets of the company that started life in Jerry Yang and David Filo’s 1994 Stanford dorm room as “Jerry and David’s Guide to the World Wide Web” — and at one point was one of the highest valued properties on… Read More


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Making your own web debugging proxy

Prompted in a hacker news thread, I’ve documented one of the ways I use nginx, a battle-tested production ready reverse proxy, as a local testing proxy.

I decided to begin using nginx as a local debugging proxy because none of the other testing proxies worked to my liking. They all had good features, but none had all of my desired features. A lot of more mature proxies just didn’t work when I tried them. Any functionality is possible when nginx is your proxy, and it is easy to set up. This blog post gives one example of what is possible with very basic tinkering.

In this post, we will build a local proxy that will log some basic info about all HTTP requests made by your computer to a log file.

installing openresty

Openresty is just nginx with the added ability to write


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Sources: Cyanogen Inc. is undergoing major layoffs, may “pivot” to apps

We’re hearing from multiple sources that Cyanogen Inc. is in the midst of laying off a significant portion of its workforce around the world today. The layoffs most heavily impact the open source arm of the Android ROM-gone-startup, which may be eliminated entirely (not CyanogenMod itself, just the people at Cyanogen Inc. who work on the open source side).
Accounts indicate that employees were called into meetings, sometimes in groups, and told they were being let go. In Seattle, Steve Kondik himself is allegedly conducting the layoffs. At this time, we’ve been told roughly 30 out of the 136 people Cyanogen Inc. employs – around 20% of the workforce – have been let go. It’s unclear if that number may change more in the coming hours and days. According to one source, the systems and QA teams in Palo Alto and Seattle have been heavily cut, with Cyanogen’s smaller offices in


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The Uber Engineering Tech Stack, Part I: The Foundation

Uber Engineering
Uber’s mission is transportation as reliable as running water, everywhere, for everyone. To make that possible, we create and work with complex data. Then we bundle it up neatly as a platform that enables drivers to get business and riders to get around.
Screenshots show Uber’s rider app in New York, China, and India as of spring 2016.
While we want Uber’s UI to be simple, we engineer complex systems behind it to stay up, handle difficult interactions, and serve massive amounts of traffic. We’ve broken up the original monolithic architecture into many parts to scale with growth. With hundreds of microservices that depend on each other, drawing a diagram of how Uber works at this point is wildly complicated, and it all changes rapidly. What we can cover in a two-part article is the stack we used as of spring 2016.

Uber Engineering’s Challenges: No Free Users, Hypergrowth
We have the same


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Linux Game Porting and Day of the Tentacle Remastered

Earlier this year, I was invited to port the remastered re-release of classic point and click adventure Day of the Tentacle to GNU/Linux.

With a successful release now behind me, I wanted to take some time to explore the experiences and learnings I’ve gained both from working on DotT Remastered and from developing my own software on Linux.

A piece of fan art I created in 2014 when it was originally announced that Day of the Tentacle Remastered would support Linux.Larger sizes can be found here.

In this article, we’ll take a look at what it’s like to get started on a port, and what kind of ups, downs and betweens are likely to be found along the way. In addition to Day of the Tentacle related anecdotes, the article also includes quotes from several other Linux porters who share some of the perspectives they’ve gained throughout their own porting careers.

Day Of The


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Cornell Opens Archive of Bird Calls Going Back to 1929

Ornithologists and bird watchers rejoice. After a dozen years, The Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Macaulay Library has fully digitized its nearly 150,000 audio recordings (a total running time of 7,513 hours), representing close to 9,000 different species, such as the very unsettling-sounding Barred Owl (above). While the collection also includes the sounds of whales, elephants, frogs, primates, and other animals, the primary emphasis here is on birds (it is a Lab of Ornithology, after all), and there is an incredible range of calls. Cornell recommends some of the highlights below:
Earliest recording: Cornell Lab founder Arthur Allen was a pioneer in sound recording. On a spring day in 1929 he recorded this Song Sparrow sounding much as they do todayYoungest bird: This clip from 1966 records the sounds of an Ostrich chick while it is still inside the egg – and the researchers as they watch
Liveliest wake-up call: A dawn chorus


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