Project delays: why good software estimates are impossible

Rubik’s cube world record
Have you ever tried to solve a Rubik’s cube and been unable to complete it? I once tried several times during a long bus trip and felt pretty bummed after failing every time. Then I learned that there are kids out there that can do it in seconds! How is that even possible?
Unexpected complexity
When you, as a programmer, start a new project, you will often not know full well how to do it, for many reasons. But you are a professional, and you’ve completed similar tasks in the past, so you either try to figure it out, or find someone who can, and ask them how, or just google it.
Very often, you do not know you’ve found yourself in this dilemma until it’s right in front of you.
Here are some examples:
You have to re-implement something using a new framework or library
A library you’re trying to use doesn’t like the other library that you’ve been


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/PR6KHoWN0CY/

Original article

Hard Forks

The crypto-currency Ethereum completed a hard fork on Wednesday. The Ethereum core developers, after getting a vote of support from the Ethereum community, hard forked Ethereum to “get back” the roughly $40mm of Ethereum that was taken in the hack of The DAO.
Hard forks are a bit of a lightning rod issue in the blockchain sector. The Bitcoin community has been debating the idea of doing a hard fork to increase the block size for well over a year. It seems that most of the Bitcoin core developers are against a hard fork and see it as risky. Bitcoin did have an accidental hard fork back in 2013, but that was dealt with quickly and confidence in the Bitcoin blockchain was restored.
I believe that hard forks are an inevitable occurrence in the blockchain sector. There have been, and will continue to be, issues that crop up that are best solved


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/OC44Viy5DO4/

Original article

Fun with the Windows Subsystem for Linux

At Build 2016, Microsoft introduced to the world the Windows Subsystem for Linux (Beta) [WSL], which enables developers to run native Ubuntu user-mode console binaries through the Bash shell in Windows 10. If you’re in the Windows Insider program, you’ve had the opportunity to try out this feature using the latest Windows Anniversary Update Insider Builds.
Web developers are used to making difficult choices on which tools and libraries they can use based on the operating system they’re actively working on. The WSL was designed and built by the Windows Kernel Team and delivered in partnership with Canonical, to help Windows 10 developers use the rich Linux developer ecosystem and tools alongside the great tools they are already using in Windows, without having to boot into another operating system or VM. This is definitely a “by developers, for developers” Windows 10 feature, specifically designed to remove a bit of friction from


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/wNzAu3Uif8Q/

Original article

HTTPS Adoption doubled this year

Despite being around for over 20 years, HTTPS has always remained very lightly adopted – until now. Data from 2 independent sources show HTTPS adoption has more than doubled in the last year, an unprecedented massive spike in adoption of this security control.

Stats from BuiltWith imply HTTPS adoption has more than tripled, going from 2.9% to 9.6% in a single year. Data from the HTTP Archive show a similar trend, with the number of HTTPS sites rising by 2.3x, from 5.5% to 12.4%. It’s important to consider timeline here – it took less than a year to secure the same number of sites it previously took 20 years to protect!

This is great news for the web, both because of the value HTTPS provides and since it’s a rare case where a security control is visibly growing in adoption. This post digs into the data, tries to explain the drivers behind


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/z3yeHFqJHDI/

Original article

Cyanogen Inc. Reportedly Fires OS Development Arm, Switches To Apps

An anonymous reader writes: Android Police is reporting that the Android software company Cyanogen Inc. will be laying off 20 percent of its workforce, and will transition from OS development to applications. The Android Police report says “roughly 30 out of the 136 people Cyanogen Inc. employs” are being cut, and that the layoffs “most heavily impact the open source arm” of the company. Android Police goes on to say that CyanogenMod development by Cyanogen Inc “may be eliminated entirely.” Ars Technica notes the differences between each “Cyanogen” branding. Specifically, CyanogenMod is a “free, open source, OS heavily based on Android and compatible with hundreds of devices,” while Cyanogen Inc. is “a for-profit company that aims to sell Cyanogen OS to OEMs.” It appears that many of the core CyanogenMod developers will no longer be paid to work on CyanogenMod, though the community is still free to develop the software.”


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/NblCzqkq_zQ/cyanogen-inc-reportedly-fires-os-development-arm-switches-to-apps

Original article

Notepad++ 6.9.2 released (tail -f)

Home
News
Notepad++ 6.9.2 released
18 May 2016 01:23:00

Log Monitoring is one of most wanted features. It is in v6.9.2 now.As indicated its name, Log Monitoring allows users to monitor log files’ writting, update by scrolling to the last line while every modification, just like Unix command “tail -f”.Click on “eye icon” on toolbar or use menu “View->Monitoring (tail -f)” to activate/disactivate this command
You may need to search in finder (find in files result) in order to narrow down search result. You can do it in v6.9.2.Launch “Find in this finder…” command via context menu of Find result panel (right click on Find result panel), a Find in Finder dialog will be display for searching in found result, and put the result in another finder result panel. You can repeat this action from the new finder result panel until you find what you want.
This release include some bug-fixes as well. Please


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/w7p0oQBLbzs/notepad-6.9.2-released.html

Original article

How You Wound Up Playing the Oregon Trail in Computer Class

The Oregon Trail, The Yukon Trail, Number Munchers, Word Munchers, The Secret Island of Dr. Quandary, Lemonade Stand, DinoPark Tycoon, Storybook Weaver. All games you played in school, all made by the same state-funded company—the Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium. Never heard of MECC? It went hand in hand with Apple Computer Inc. in its earliest days. Steve Jobs said as much in a 1995 interview with the Smithsonian Institution: “One of the things that built Apple II’s was schools buying Apple II’s.” Apple II’s loaded with MECC games.

Minnesota was a Midwestern Silicon Valley by the early 1970s. The State of Minnesota threw huge funds to entice computer programmers to Minneapolis and Saint Paul when it created MECC in 1973. From 1978 to 1999, MECC, together with Apple, competed against private software companies to turn American children into a nation of computer-savvy


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/2vPmq6Wt5uQ/

Original article

Show HN: Parse recipe ingredients using JavaScript

README.md

Parses ingredient strings into units, amounts and ingredient names. Forked from the now dead Ingreedyjs project.

Installation

npm install ingredients-parser –save

Usage

var parser = require(‘ingredients-parser’);

var result = parser.parse(‘500ml milk’);
result.amount //=> ‘500’
result.unit //=> ‘ml’
result.ingredient //=> “milk”

result = parser.parse(‘two kg of all purpouse flour’);
result.amount //=> ‘two’
result.unit //=> ‘kg’
result.ingredient //=> “all purpouse flour”

Contributing

If you wish to change the parser you need to change rules.pegjs file. The pegjs-generated.js file is generated by PEG.js.

Building

make build

Testing

make test


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/lukVLSxdmPY/ingredients-parser

Original article

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: