Securing Docker with TLS certificates

By default, Docker has no authentication or authorization for its API, instead relying on the filesystem security of its UNIX socket, /var/run/docker.sock, which by default is only accessible by the root user.

This is fine for the basic use case of only accessing the Docker API on the local machine via the socket as the root user. However if you wish to use the Docker API over TCP, you’ll want to secure it so you don’t have to give out root access to anyone that happens to poke you on the TCP port.

Docker supports using TLS certificates (both on the server and the client) to provide proof of identity. When set up correctly it will only allow clients and servers with a certificate signed by a specific CA to talk to eachother.

While not providing fine grained access permissions, it does at least allow us to listen on a TCP socket and


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Dropbox’s Lepton lossless image compression really uses a ‘middle-out’ algorithm

 The “middle-out” algorithm that has its roots in the most infamous (and probably funniest) scene in HBO’s “Silicon Valley” may have been fictional, but something like it can be found in Lepton, a cool new lossless image compressor created by Dropbox. Read More


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JupyterLab: the next generation of the Jupyter Notebook

Learning the lessons of the Jupyter Notebook

It’s been a long time in the making, but today we want to start engaging our community with an early (pre-alpha) release of the next generation of the Jupyter Notebook application, which we are calling JupyterLab.

At the SciPy 2016 conference, Brian Granger and Jason Grout presented (PDF of talk slides) the overall vision of the system and gave a demo of its current capabilities, which are rapidly evolving and improving:

JupyterLab captures a lot of what we have learned from the usage patterns of the Notebook application over the last 5 years and seeks to build a clean and robust foundation that will let us not only offer an improved user interface and experience, but also a flexible and extensible environment for interactive computing.

In reality, even today’s “Jupyter Notebook” is a bit of a misnomer: the Notebook application includes not only support for Notebooks


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Real–world HTTP/2: 400gb of images per day

The now–finalized HTTP/2 specification has rightfully garnered a lot of interest from the web performance community. The new protocol is aimed at addressing common network performance issues with the aging HTTP/1.x protocol, whilst preserving the existing semantics.

We began a small-scale rollout for static assets earlier this year. After building confidence in our new infrastructure, we began transitioning our static assets to HTTP/2. Surprisingly, some sections of our platform felt noticeably slower. This post will cover our investigation into the performance regressions we experienced by adopting HTTP/2.

Our story isn’t the panacea of web performance typically associated with HTTP/2. We hope sharing our sobering experience will help to balance the discussion.

Why HTTP/2?

For better or worse, the story of HTTP/2 has become tied to notions of free performance and how it will make everything we know about web performance wrong.

In reality the performance story of HTTP/2 is one of nuances.

Unlike


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Build Your Own Mini NES With a Raspberry Pi and This 3D Printed Case

Nintendo’s new Mini NES is a cool, tiny little Nintendo console that’s on its way in November, but you don’t have to wait that long to get one for yourself. With a 3D printed case and a Raspberry Pi, you can easily make your own.Read more…


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Raspberry Pi 3 creator hopes for Windows 10 desktop OS support

Raspberry Pi was originally aimed at students and hobbyists, and it can now function as a Linux computer.If support for Microsoft’s Windows 10 desktop OS is added to the latest Raspberry Pi 3, it could become a viable computer for millions of PC users who are not technically savvy.Support for Windows 10 desktop is on founder Eben Upton’s wishlist for Raspberry Pi 3, which shipped in February. The mini computer already supports Windows 10 IoT Core, a stripped-down version of the OS for Internet of Things devices.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here


Original URL: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3095908/computer-hardware/raspberry-pi-3-creator-hopes-for-windows-10-desktop-os-support.html#tk.rss_all

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Atlassian acquires StatusPage

 Atlassian today announced that it has acquired StatusPage, a Y Combinator-incubated service that allows online businesses to keep their users updated about the status of their online services. The financial details of the transaction were not disclosed. This marks Atlassian’s first acquisition since going public last December. Adding a service like StatusPage, which launched three… Read More


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AWS buys Cloud9 IDE in snub to Google

Amazon Web Services has bought Cloud9, a popular web-based developer environment that recently aligned itself with the Google Cloud Platform.
Cloud9 is a browser-based IDE (integrated development environment) with a fairly rich feature set for building and deploying applications. Because it runs in a browser, developers can pick up their work from any machine, and Cloud9 has tools that let developers collaborate on projects.
Along with Codenvy, it was one of the few remaining popular, independent cloud IDEs.
“While the cloud IDE space is hot, as a market, IDEs are not an easy way to make money,” said IDC analyst Al Hilwa. “The technology is better used as a sweetener to make broader platforms more attractive to developers.”To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here


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