ArXiv preprint server plans multimillion-dollar overhaul

Carla DeMello/Cornell University Library Oya Rieger, arXiv’s programme director, is seeking a compelling vision for the site.

A multimillion-dollar funding drive is being readied to transform arXiv, the vastly popular repository to which physicists, computer scientists and math­ematicians flock to share their research preprints openly. But the results of an enormous user survey published this week suggest that researchers are wary of drastic changes to a site that has become an essential part of the infrastructure of modern science. Last year, the site served up around 139 million downloads, and it now holds more than 1.1 million free papers. But it is being sustained by fragile code, donations from libraries and a charitable foundation and the good will of about 150 or so volunteer moderators, says the site’s programme director, Oya Rieger. With its 25th anniversary approaching in August, arXiv’s advisory teams of scientists and librarians are considering a plan that involves raising US$2.5 million to $3


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Slackware 14.2 released

 

Yes, it is that time again (finally)! Following a long period of
planning, development, and testing, the Slackware Linux Project is proud
to announce the latest stable release of the longest running distribution
of the Linux operating system, Slackware version 14.2!

We are sure you’ll enjoy the many improvements. We’ve done our best
to bring the latest technology to Slackware while still maintaining the
stability and security that you have come to expect. Slackware is well
known for its simplicity and the fact that we try to bring software to
you in the condition that the authors intended.

Slackware 14.2 brings many updates and enhancements, among which
you’ll find two of the most advanced desktop environments available
today: Xfce 4.12.1, a fast and lightweight but visually appealing and
easy to use desktop environment, and KDE 4.14.21 (KDE 4.14.3 with
kdelibs-4.14.21) a stable release of the 4.14.x series of the


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Dyalog APL v15.0 Free for Non-Commercial Use

In accordance with tradition, Dyalog is marking the beginning of summer with a new release of Dyalog APL – and this time we are celebrating with a brand new icon! As of June 30th 2016, Dyalog APL version 15.0 is available on all platforms. The full list of supported platforms is currently:
Microsoft Windows (from Vista onwards, Microsoft.NET bridge requires .NET 4.0 or later)
IBM AIX (6.1 with POWER5 or higher)
x86 and x64 Linux (built on RedHat 6 but works on most recent distributions)
Raspberry Pi (Raspbian Wheezy and Jessie)
Apple OS X (Yosemite and onwards, with Macs produced in 2010 or later)
As usual, the new release takes us several steps down our Road Map (for a presentation of the Road Map, see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiCGnsGjTC8). Highlights of version 15.0 include:
Free Non-Commercial Licences

To make it easier for students, researchers and others who would like to experiment with Dyalog APL to get started, we are making Educational,


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The WRT54GL: A 54Mbps router from 2005 still makes millions for Linksys

The WRT54GL.LinksysIn a time when consumers routinely replace gadgets with new models after just two or three years, some products stand out for being built to last.
Witness the Linksys WRT54GL, the famous wireless router that came out in 2005 and is still for sale. At first glance, there seems to be little reason to buy the WRT54GL in the year 2016. It uses the 802.11g Wi-Fi standard, which has been surpassed by 802.11n and 802.11ac. It delivers data over the crowded 2.4GHz frequency band and is limited to speeds of 54Mbps. You can buy a new router—for less money—and get the benefit of modern standards, expansion into the 5GHz band, and data rates more than 20 times higher.
Despite all that, people still buy the WRT54GL in large enough numbers that Linksys continues to earn millions of dollars per year selling an 11-year-old product without ever changing its specs or design.
“To be honest,


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Use Apache Spark? This tool can help you tap machine learning

Finding insight in oceans of data is one of enterprises’ most pressing challenges, and increasingly artificial intelligence is being brought in to help. Now, a new tool for Apache Spark aims to put machine learning within closer reach.
Announced Friday, Sparkling Water 2.0 is a major new update from H2O.ai that’s designed to make it easier for companies using Spark to bring machine-learning algorithms into their analyses. It’s essentially an API (application programming interface) that lets Spark users tap H2O’s open-source artificial-intelligence platform instead of — or alongside — the algorithms included in Spark’s own MLlib machine-learning library.To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here


Original URL: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3090998/data-analytics/use-apache-spark-this-tool-can-help-you-tap-machine-learning.html#tk.rss_all

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The WRT54GL: A 54Mbps Router From 2005 Still Makes Millions For Linksys

Jon Brodkin, reporting for Ars Technica:In a time when consumers routinely replace gadgets with new models after just two or three years, some products stand out for being built to last. Witness the Linksys WRT54GL, the famous wireless router that came out in 2005 and is still for sale. At first glance, there seems to be little reason to buy the WRT54GL in the year 2016. It uses the 802.11g Wi-Fi standard, which has been surpassed by 802.11n and 802.11ac. It delivers data over the crowded 2.4GHz frequency band and is limited to speeds of 54Mbps. You can buy a new router — for less money — and get the benefit of modern standards, expansion into the 5GHz band, and data rates more than 20 times higher. Despite all that, people still buy the WRT54GL in large enough numbers that Linksys continues to earn millions of dollars per year selling


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/D2VZwfXBaMI/the-wrt54gl-a-54mbps-router-from-2005-still-makes-millions-for-linksys

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