Internet Archive: Free Interdisciplinary Resource

 Remember our post from last week about judicial notice and the Wayback Machine? Well, the Wayback Machine is just one part of the Internet Archive, which can be a useful resource for free research on the web. The Internet Archive is a non-profit organization dedicated to building an Internet library. The organization’s mission includes gathering […]


Original URL: http://cmlawlibraryblog.classcaster.net/2016/05/19/internet-archive-free-interdisciplinary-resource/

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The Average Age For a Child Getting Their First Smartphone Is Now 10.3 Years

An anonymous reader writes: A TechCrunch article, citing a report on Influence Central, states that the average age for a child getting their smartphone is now 10.3 years. The report adds that 64% of kids have access to the Internet via their own laptop or tablet, compared to just 42% in 2012. Also, 39% of kids get a social media account at 11.4 years, and 11% get a social media account when they were younger than 10.


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Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/TpeCJGprPVc/the-average-age-for-a-child-getting-their-first-smartphone-is-now-103-years

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Google Instant Apps – run native apps without installing

Posted by Suresh Ganapathy, Product Manager


Developers have built amazing Android apps. They use your mobile device to the fullest, including the camera, GPS, and sensors to connect to the real world. They’re beautiful and immersive, with Material Design and smooth animations running at 60 frames per second. They use access to identity and payments to create seamless experiences.

But developers tell us they wish they could bring users into their apps more quickly and easily. With the web, you can click on a link and land on a web page — it takes one click and just a few seconds. It should be easier for users to access a wider range of apps, and for developers to reach more people.

So, we asked ourselves: How do we make it possible for people to access a wider range of apps, seamlessly? How do we help developers reach more people? And how do we do that while giving developers access to the range of capabilities and experiences that Android apps provide?

Today we’re sharing a preview of a new project that we think will change how people experience Android apps. We call it Android Instant Apps, and it evolves Android apps to be able to run instantly, without requiring installation. With Instant Apps, a tap on a URL can open right in an Android app, even if the user doesn’t have that app installed.

As a developer, you won’t need to build a new, separate app. It’s the same Android APIs, the same project, the same source code. You’ll simply update your existing Android app to take advantage of Instant Apps functionality. In fact, it can take less than a day to get up and running for some developers, though the effort involved will vary depending on how your app is structured. You modularize your app, and Google Play downloads only the parts that are needed, on the fly. And when you do upgrade, your app will be available to more than a billion users on Android devices going back to Jelly Bean.

This is a big change, so it’s going to take some time. We’ve been working with a small set of partners to help refine the experience, including developers like BuzzFeed, B&H Photo, Medium, Hotel Tonight, Zumper and Disney. We’ll be gradually expanding access for developers and bringing Instant Apps to users later this year.

B&H Photo
(via Google Search)
BuzzFeedVideo
(via a shared link)
Park and Pay (example)
(via NFC)

If you’re interested in learning more about Android Instant Apps, please check out the Android developers website, where you can sign up for updates as they become available. We can’t wait to see what you build when your app is just a tap away.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/ThMNeI-_wgs/android-instant-apps-evolving-apps.html

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License to ILL

siloInter-library loan (ILL) is one of the oldest forms of sharing collections in libraries. Cooperative collection development arrangements have existed since time immemorial. As each library has focused on building collections to meet the needs of their primary patrons, they have relied on other libraries for the ad hoc, out-of-scope user requests for books and journal articles.They either initiate ILLs formally via OCLC or another network or informally by calling, emailing, or otherwise contacting librarians at other institutions who own or have access to the needed item. Everyone ILLs. It is expected and needed. Librarians have a license to ILL.So why aren’t more librarians using this powerful weapon?

Why Go on a ILL-Less Mission?

I see more and more requests for copies of cases, copies of journal articles, and copies of book chapters or tables of contents on the listservs that I monitor. I set my law-lib listserv subscription to digest so I would only see these requests once a day, but I have seen an increase in these requests for materials on the other listservs to which I subscribe. I receive the ILL messages as they are posted. I am perplexed as to why this phenomenon is occuring. Do librarians not know how to ILL any more? Do they not know how to establish ILL arrangements? Do librarians have smaller in-house collections or subscription and that is why they are ILLing more? Are users requesting materials that need to be delivered yesterday or sooner than ILL can provide? Or, but no, it can’t be – are the librarians being lazy?! Because you never make requests for items on a listserv without having failed in getting it through ILL first.

How to ILL

I always assume that librarians are not lazy and do their homework, so perhaps the knowledge about ILL’ing isn’t being passed on from generation to generation? The tradition of ILLing is being lost? So here is how to ILL.

First, make sure you have accurate information. If you just have a case name and no citation to the source, get that. If you have an unknown abbreviation, decypher it. If you don’t have pagination for a book chapter or an article, get it. Some useful tools are the Cardiff Index to Legal Abbreviations, library catalogs including Open WorldCat and the Karlsruhe Virtual Catalog, full-text law and non-law journal databases/scholarship repositories, and digital libraries like Google Books, HathiTrust, Gallica, etc. And some of these digital libraries could have the book, case, or journal article you’re seeking! The more information you have, the easier and faster it is to ILL when you need.

Once you have full information, you can initiate an ILL request. For newbies, note that you can not only ILL books, but also copies of cases, journal articles, government and international documents, and book chapters. For these partial sources, you need page numbers. Nowadays, you can sometimes get books within four to seven days of your requests, and scanned copies of cases and articles within a couple of days. ILL delivery times are much faster than they used to be. Try it and see!

If your library does not have a formal ILL arrangement, you can use the informal, old-fashioned, but still great “ILL” method – contact another librarian directly! This is helpful if you need something in a couple of hours, that day, or the next. Remember though, the other librarian’s time is important, so make sure you’ve exhausted other options – have done some searching first and ILL would take too long, etc. It’s like crying wolf too often. You don’t want that other librarian not to respond when you really need help in the future. Also, “help fatigue” is a real thing. Nice helpful librarians can get tired of helping…

Tip: Cultivate your informal ILL networks! Meet new librarians every chance you get. Try to attend conferences, workshops, symposia. Subscribe to listservs. Get a Twitter acount. Connect with librarians on Facebook and other social media. Every person you meet is a potential ILL resource. Network, network, network!

Conclusion

ILLing is a librarian competency. And with more and more collections budget cuts, a necessity. James Bond doesn’t go on a mission without first checking in with Q and getting his tools for the mission. And making sure his gun’s in order. He does his homework, his preparation first. Before doing an ISO (In Search Of) request on a listserv, check with your ILL folks first or try to ILL informally, off-list. You have a license to ILL. Use it! And best wishes on a successful mission!


Original URL: http://www.slaw.ca/2016/05/19/license-to-ill/

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Filmmakers Ask ‘Pirate’ to Take Polygraph, Backtrack When He Agrees

The makers of Dallas Buyers Club (a 2014 movie, which won three Academy awards) are going to great lengths to crackdown on BitTorrent pirates. According to a report on piracy news blog TorrentFreak, the filmmakers challenged an accused pirate to submit a polygraph test to prove that he didn’t download a copyright infringing copy of their movie. The accused pirate, California resident Michael Amhari, insists that he did not download any pirated copy of the Dallas Buyers Club and agreed to take the polygraph test. Upon hearing this, the filmmakers, who had imposed a $100,000 fine on Amhari, retracted the offer. “When plaintiff’s counsel then agreed to take such a test with the proviso that defense costs and attorney fees be covered, plaintiff then refused to pay costs and revoked his offer to conduct a polygraph,” said Amhari’s counsel Clay Renick. TorrentFreak reports: “After receiving exculpatory evidence and the sworn declaration of defendant, Mr. Davis then refused to file a dismissal and proceeded to demand that defendant appear in the action or he would file a default.” The defendant’s counsel added: âoeThis behavior is galling and it should not be permitted by the court.â Because of these dubious tactics the court should set aside the default that was entered earlier this month. According to Renick, Dallas Buyer’s Club has nothing more than an IP-address to back up their infringement claims, which is not enough to prove guilt.


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Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/hWjrBvmyt14/filmmakers-ask-pirate-to-take-polygraph-backtrack-when-he-agrees

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Installing a Web, Email & MySQL Database Cluster on Debian 8.4 Jessie with ISPConfig 3.1

This tutorial describes the installation of a clustered web, email, database and DNS server to be used for redundancy, high availability and load balancing on Debian 8 with the ISPConfig 3 control panel. MySQL Master/Master replication will be used to replicate the MySQL client databases between the servers, Unison will be used to Sync the /var/www (websites) and the Mails will be synced with Dovecot.


Original URL: https://www.howtoforge.com/tutorial/installing-a-web-email-and-mysql-database-cluster-on-debian-8.4-with-ispconfig-3/

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Chromebooks Outsell Macs For the First Time In the US

An anonymous reader shares a report on The Verge: Google’s low-cost Chromebooks outsold Apple’s range of Macs for the first time in the U.S. recently. IDC analyst Linn Huang confirmed the milestone to The Verge. “Chrome OS overtook Mac OS in the US in terms of shipments for the first time in 1Q16,” says Huang. “Chromebooks are still largely a US K-12 story.” IDC estimates Apple’s U.S. Mac shipments to be around 1.76 million in the latest quarter, meaning Dell, HP, and Lenovo sold nearly 2 million Chromebooks in Q1 combined. Chromebooks have been extremely popular in US schools, and it’s clear from IDC’s comments the demand is driving US shipments. Outside of the US, it’s still unclear exactly how well Google’s low-cost laptops are doing. Most data from market research firms like IDC and Gartner focuses solely on Google’s wins in the US.


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Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/dH_aOKLPExk/chromebooks-outsell-macs-for-the-first-time-in-the-us

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