Show HN: Go Actor Model, ultra fast distributed actors for Golang

README.md

GAM is a MVP Actor Model framework for Go.

Design principles:

Minimalistic API
In the spirit of Go, the API should be small and easy to use.
Avoid enterprisey JVM like containers and configurations.

Build on existing technologies – There are already a lot of great tech for e.g. networking and clustering, build on those.
e.g. gRPC streams for networking, Consul.IO for clustering.

Pass data, not objects – Serialization is an explicit concern, don’t try to hide it.
Protobuf all the way.

Be fast – Do not trade performance for magic API trickery.

Ultra fast remoting, GAM currently manages to pass 800k+ messages between nodes using only two actors, while still preserving message order!

:> node1.exe
2016/04/30 20:33:48 Host is 127.0.0.1:55567
2016/04/30 20:33:48 Started EndpointManager
2016/04/30 20:33:48 Starting GAM server on 127.0.0.1:55567.
2016/04/30 20:33:48 Started EndpointWriter for host 127.0.0.1:8080
2016/04/30 20:33:48 Connecting to host 127.0.0.1:8080
2016/04/30 20:33:48 Connected to host 127.0.0.1:8080
2016/04/30 20:33:48 Getting stream from host 127.0.0.1:8080
2016/04/30 20:33:48 Got stream from host 127.0.0.1:8080
2016/04/30 20:33:48 Starting to send
2016/04/30 20:33:48 50000
2016/04/30 20:33:48 100000
...snip...
2016/04/30 20:33:50 950000
2016/04/30 20:33:50 1000000
2016/04/30 20:33:50 Elapsed 2.4237125s

2016/04/30 20:33:50 Msg per sec 825180 <---

Why Actors

batman

  • Decoupled Concurrency
  • Distributed by default
  • Fault tolerance

For a more indepth description of the differences, see this thread Actors vs. CSP

Hello world

type Hello struct{ Who string }
type HelloActor struct{}

func (state *HelloActor) Receive(context actor.Context) {
    switch msg := context.Message().(type) {
    case Hello:
        fmt.Printf("Hello %vn", msg.Who)
    }
}

func main() {
    props := actor.FromInstance(&HelloActor{})
    pid := actor.Spawn(props)
    pid.Tell(Hello{Who: "Roger"})
    console.ReadLine()
}

State machines / Become and Unbecome

type Become struct{}
type Hello struct{ Who string }
type BecomeActor struct{}

func (state *BecomeActor) Receive(context actor.Context) {
    switch msg := context.Message().(type) {
    case Hello:
        fmt.Printf("Hello %vn", msg.Who)
        context.Become(state.Other)
    }
}

func (state *BecomeActor) Other(context actor.Context) {
    switch msg := context.Message().(type) {
    case Hello:
        fmt.Printf("%v, ey we are now handling messages in another behavior", msg.Who)
    }
}

func NewBecomeActor() actor.Actor {
    return &BecomeActor{}
}

func main() {
    props := actor.FromProducer(NewBecomeActor)
    pid := actor.Spawn(props)
    pid.Tell(Hello{Who: "Roger"})
    pid.Tell(Hello{Who: "Roger"})
    console.ReadLine()
}

Lifecycle events

Unlike Akka, GAM uses messages for lifecycle events instead of OOP method overrides

type Hello struct{ Who string }
type HelloActor struct{}

func (state *HelloActor) Receive(context actor.Context) {
    switch msg := context.Message().(type) {
    case actor.Started:
        fmt.Println("Started, initialize actor here")
    case actor.Stopping:
        fmt.Println("Stopping, actor is about shut down")
    case actor.Stopped:
        fmt.Println("Stopped, actor and it's children are stopped")
    case actor.Restarting:
        fmt.Println("Restarting, actor is about restart")
    case Hello:
        fmt.Printf("Hello %vn", msg.Who)
    }
}

func main() {
    props := actor.FromInstance(&HelloActor{})
    actor := actor.Spawn(props)
    actor.Tell(Hello{Who: "Roger"})

    //why wait?
    //Stop is a system message and is not processed through the user message mailbox
    //thus, it will be handled _before_ any user message
    //we only do this to show the correct order of events in the console
    time.Sleep(1 * time.Second)
    actor.Stop()

    console.ReadLine()
}

Supervision

Root actors are supervised by the actor.DefaultSupervisionStrategy(), which always issues a actor.RestartDirective for failing actors
Child actors are supervised by their parents.
Parents can customize their child supervisor strategy using gam.Props

Example

type Hello struct{ Who string }
type ParentActor struct{}

func (state *ParentActor) Receive(context actor.Context) {
    switch msg := context.Message().(type) {
    case Hello:
        props := actor.FromProducer(NewChildActor)
        child := context.Spawn(props)
        child.Tell(msg)
    }
}

func NewParentActor() actor.Actor {
    return &ParentActor{}
}

type ChildActor struct{}

func (state *ChildActor) Receive(context actor.Context) {
    switch msg := context.Message().(type) {
    case actor.Started:
        fmt.Println("Starting, initialize actor here")
    case actor.Stopping:
        fmt.Println("Stopping, actor is about shut down")
    case actor.Stopped:
        fmt.Println("Stopped, actor and it's children are stopped")
    case actor.Restarting:
        fmt.Println("Restarting, actor is about restart")
    case Hello:
        fmt.Printf("Hello %vn", msg.Who)
        panic("Ouch")
    }
}

func NewChildActor() actor.Actor {
    return &ChildActor{}
}

func main() {
    decider := func(child *actor.PID, reason interface{}) actor.Directive {
        fmt.Println("handling failure for child")
        return actor.StopDirective
    }
    supervisor := actor.NewOneForOneStrategy(10, 1000, decider)
    props := actor.
        FromProducer(NewParentActor).
        WithSupervisor(supervisor)

    pid := actor.Spawn(props)
    pid.Tell(Hello{Who: "Roger"})

    console.ReadLine()
}

Networking / Remoting

GAM’s networking layer is built as a thin wrapper ontop of gRPC and message serialization is built on Protocol Buffers

Example

Node 1

type MyActor struct{
    count int
}

func (state *MyActor) Receive(context actor.Context) {
    switch msg := context.Message().(type) {
    case *messages.Response:
        state.count++
        fmt.Println(state.count)
    }
}

func main() {
    remoting.StartServer("localhost:8090")

    pid := actor.SpawnTemplate(&MyActor{})
    message := &messages.Echo{Message: "hej", Sender: pid}

    //this is the remote actor we want to communicate with
    remote := actor.NewPID("localhost:8091", "myactor")
    for i := 0; i < 10; i++ {
        remote.Tell(message)
    }

    console.ReadLine()
}

Node 2

type MyActor struct{}

func (*MyActor) Receive(context actor.Context) {
    switch msg := context.Message().(type) {
    case *messages.Echo:
        msg.Sender.Tell(&messages.Response{
            SomeValue: "result",
        })
    }
}

func main() {
    remoting.StartServer("localhost:8091")
    pid := actor.SpawnTemplate(&MyActor{})

    //register a name for our local actor so that it can be discovered remotely
    actor.ProcessRegistry.Register("myactor", pid)
    console.ReadLine()
}

Message Contracts

syntax = "proto3";
package messages;
import "actor.proto"; //we need to import actor.proto, so our messages can include PID's

//this is the message the actor on node 1 will send to the remote actor on node 2
message Echo {
  actor.PID Sender = 1; //this is the PID the remote actor should reply to
  string Message = 2;
}

//this is the message the remote actor should reply with
message Response {
  string SomeValue = 1;
}

For more examples, see the example folder in this repository.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/IOnrB2pKRxQ/gam

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