Slack raises $200M at $3.8B valuation for business messaging

The Slack rocketship won’t slow down. The business messaging startup has raised $200 million at a $3.8 billion post-money valuation, the company confirms to TechCrunch. The round was led by Thrive Capital, with participation by GGV, Comcast Ventures and Slack’s existing investors, including Accel, Index Ventures and Social Capital.

This brings the total funding for the three-year-old company to a whopping $540 million. Slack last raised at a $2.8 billion valuation in April of last year.

“As has always been the case, we are taking this opportunity to further secure our leadership position as we continue to execute on our ambitious growth plans. This capital adds to our existing reserves and increases our ability to focus on an uncompromising long-term, strategic view.” – Stewart Butterfield, CEO and co-founder, Slack, said in a statement.

“We are excited to partner with Slack as it continues to re-imagine how teams work together,” said Josh Kushner, managing partner at Thrive Capital, in a statement. “We believe Slack will define the future of seamless communication in an increasingly complex world across platforms, teams and applications.”

Corporate customers include NASA, LinkedIn and Spotify. We use Slack for internal communication at TechCrunch.The San Francisco-based company has 430 employees.

Slack, which has received a lot of attention in Silicon Valley, with its promise to reduce email, has 2.7 million daily users, which is significant for an enterprise startup. The company recently received an award at our annual Crunchie’s ceremony for “fastest rising startup.”

Slack New Features

With its hype, funding, user count, and developer momentum, Slack looks like a runaway train. Competitors might be able to copy its core features, but not its network effect or ecosystem of integrated apps and chatbots.

Those who believe this growth will continue might see the valuation as a little low, though it puts a high lifetime value on current users. Slack might have interesting plans for what to do with the extra $200 million it now has in its war chest. Acquisitions, high-profile hires, and hardcore R&D are all opportunities. For example, it’s now working on rolling out voice chat and is building video chat.

The question now is, can anyone stop Slack?

Featured Image: Slack


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/anctzdQG39I/slack-raises-200m-at-3-8b-valuation-for-business-messaging

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Squash Your Pull Requests on GitHub

Git’s flexibility allows you to shape your workflow however you like. The organization of your git history is just one of the choices to make, but up until now the merge button on GitHub only created merge commits, resulting in a style of history that didn’t necessarily match your own workflow.

Merge commits

For years, the merge button on GitHub has created merge commits (i.e. git merge --no-ff) which retain all of the commits in your branch and interleaves them with commits on the base branch. The result of a merge commit is a visually complex, but more accurate log that depicts how changes from a feature branch came to be on the base branch. Here’s what that looks like today:

Merge commits create accurate, but more complex history

Enter commit squashing

Commit squashing has the benefit of keeping your git history tidy and easier to digest than the alternative created by merge commits. While merge commits retain commits like “oops missed a spot” and “maybe fix that test? [round 2]”, squashing retains the changes but omits the individual commits from history. Many people prefer this workflow because, while those work-in-progress commits are helpful when working on a feature branch, they aren’t necessarily important to retain when looking at the history of your base branch. Here’s what squashing on merge looks like:

What’s changing?

Repository administrators now have a few options to choose from when deciding how to handle history.

New merge button settings

Allow merge commits and commit squashing

This option will leave the decision to create a merge commit or squash up to the user doing the merging. This lets repository administrators stay flexible when deciding whether or not to retain all history from a feature branch.

Only allow merge commits

This is the default behavior and is exactly how the merge button worked before this change. Collaborators won’t have the option to squash their commits via the merge button.

Only allow squash commits

This is a new option which lets you force commit squashing on all pull requests merged via the merge button.

Squash and merge

Check out the documentation or get in touch with any questions or feedback. Enjoy!


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/0_Z4I7YjYAA/2141-squash-your-commits

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Swift vs. Go

March 8, 2016

In many respects Swift and Go both feel like they are motivated by the same desires of having a modern, succinct, simple, safe, and fast programming language for everyday use. So here is a superficial comparison (the differences are bolded):

Go
1 Inferred strong static typing
2 Structs and interfaces
3 Fast compilation
4 Native binary & scripting mode
5 Concurrency: channels
6 Garbage collection
7 Large standard library
8 Large corporate backer (Google)
9 Open source
10 OS level access
11 C interoperability

Swift
1 Inferred strong static typing
2 Structs and protocols
3 Compilation speed TBD
4 Native binary & scripting mode
5 Concurrency TBD: native/green threads/async-await/channels/actors
6 Automatic refrence counting
7 Large standard library
8 Large corporate backer (Apple)
9 Open source
10 OS level access
11 C interoperability
12 Generics
13 Enums
14 OOP fallback

Go has really taken off among people who traditionally used languages like Ruby, Python, Node.js but are looking for more safety and speed. I hope they take a look at Swift as it matures in the next few years.

3

Kudos

3

Kudos


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/9jOl3nx9qwk/swift-vs-go

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Everything You Need to Set Up Bluetooth on the Raspberry Pi 3

One of the best new features of the Raspberry Pi 3 is its on-board Bluetooth , but while the software needed to get it working is easy to install, it might be a bit baffling to use. Element14 has a guide to working with Bluetooth from Raspbian.

Read more…



Original URL: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/lifehacker/full/~3/RSun8IzMVlE/everything-you-need-to-set-up-bluetooth-on-the-raspberr-1768482065

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Can Slack transform enterprise communication once and for all?

slackdroid_2x Those of us who have been around the block a few times have seen multiple attempts to kill email and change the way people communicate in the enterprise. Slack is just the latest, but one that has captured market share and money along the way. Consider that just today, Slack got $200 million in funding on a whopping $3.8 billion valuation. It launched just three years ago and has raised… Read More


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/cFsuW2ytg9g/

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RaspEX Linux for Raspberry Pi 3 Gets Kodi Media Center, Bluetooth Support

RaspEX Build 160331 arrives today as a free upgrade for existing users, and includes the Kodi media center software, Wicd network manager, Mozilla Firefox web browser


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/linuxtoday/linux/~3/moBI2GX57II/raspex-linux-for-raspberry-pi-3-gets-kodi-media-center-bluetooth-support-160331145613.html

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