Western Digital releases affordable WD PiDrive 314GB HDD for Raspberry Pi

wdThe Raspberry Pi line of computers are so much fun.  By utilizing an OS-loaded memory card, it is easy to get started, making it a great project for young technology enthusiasts.

But what if you prefer a larger mechanical hard disk drive to an SD card? Sure, you can leverage a USB variant, but they typically aren’t designed for the Raspberry Pi. Today, Western Digital announces a Raspberry Pi-focused HDD, called the WD PiDrive 314GB. Yes, as you can probably guess from the name, the low-power drive features 314 gigabytes.

“The WD PiDrive 314GB device is based on Western Digital’s proven, high-volume 500GB platform with design changes made specifically for Raspberry Pi. Customizations made to the drive’s magnetic recording and electrical system operating set-points align with Raspberry Pi’s USB data and power design to reduce the electrical power load of the hard drive on Raspberry Pi, while still maintaining sufficient performance to deliver maximum USB data transfer rate. Platform design flexibility and the manufacturing tuning process enabled WDLabs to create this specialized product for Raspberry Pi efficiently without compromising quality and reliability”, says Western Digital.

The company further says, “WDLabs and the author of BerryBoot, a highly regarded, well-established and free software solution that simplifies the loading of multiple software applications, have created a special version of BerryBoot for WD PiDrive device customers, which includes software applications featuring the use of mass-storage devices with Raspberry Pi.  Many operating systems and software applications can be stored on the WD PiDrive HDD, taking full advantage of the 314GB of storage. Upon system boot-up, the OS can be selected from the BerryBoot menu and launched with a couple of mouse clicks”.

While this all sounds cool, it is the price that makes it particularly intriguing. Western Digital quotes a price of $45.81, but the drive is getting a Pi Day-inspired discount of 31.4 percent, which brings it to a super-low $31.42. It is not clear how long the discount will last, so you should definitely act fast. Grab one here for the Raspberry Pi Model B+, 2 Model B, and 3.

Will you buy the WD PiDrive 314GB for your Raspberry Pi? Tell me in the comments.


Original URL: http://feeds.betanews.com/~r/bn/~3/eGPgFe26iSY/

Original article

Microsoft did a whoopsy — previous announcement about dropping Bitcoin was a mistake

oops

Earlier today we reported that Microsoft was no longer accepting Bitcoin as a form of payment. It turns out that this is not true. Microsoft made a mistake.

Despite making a very clear change to its support pages that said “Microsoft Store doesn’t accept Bitcoin” the company will in fact continue to support the cryptocurrency. This is not a change of heart, it was nothing more than a slip up, but Microsoft has not offered much of an explanation as to how it came about.

While mistakes are certainly made from time to time, updating the support pages in a way that made it abundantly clear the Bitcoin was being ditched is a little odd. Whether there have been crossed lines of communication within Microsoft, or the Bitcoin drop was something that had been considered and accidently announced, we’ll probably never know.

In a statement to BetaNews, Microsoft apologized and clarified its position:

We continue to support Bitcoin for adding money to your Microsoft Account which can be used for purchasing content in the Windows and Xbox stores. We apologize for inaccurate information that was inadvertently posted to a Microsoft site, which is currently being corrected.

Photo credit: Palto / Shutterstock


Original URL: http://feeds.betanews.com/~r/bn/~3/avbcJ7hL2Fo/

Original article

Show HN: Convenient web rss-reader

README.MD

is open source feed reader with customizable plugin system for any content (atom, rss, youtube channels…).

  1. install java
  2. download truerss-${version}.jar
  3. add config
// Sample config (with sqlite backend)
truerss {
  port = 8000
  host = localhost
  wsPort = 8080
  update-parallelism = 10
  db {
    backend = sqlite
    port = ""
    host = ""
    dbname = "/path/to/dbName.db"
    username = ""
    password = ""
  }
  plugins = {}
}
  1. run with java -jar -Xmx150m path/to/truerss-${version}.jar &
  2. open in browser localhost:8000/
  3. enjoy!

Before work

  1. install java
  2. scala, and sbt
  3. for ui part install coffeescript

Compile app with rake or with sbt jsbuild command

And then…

  1. clone repo
  2. run sbt
  3. for work with UI need install web-dependencies (with sbt install) and coffeescript
  4. for backend part just open in your IDE and add feature, fix bugs
  5. create pull request


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/WySjLOnsyE0/truerss

Original article

Some of the best adventure games ever are now playable on Raspberry Pi

monkey Island

It’s Pi Day, so naturally the Raspberry Pi Foundation has a little gift for Raspberry Pi owners. No, it’s not new hardware, but rather news that you can now play some of the all-time best point and click adventure games on the diminutive board.

The popular adventure game emulator ScummVM has now been ported over to the Raspberry Pi, allowing users to enjoy some of the greatest games from the early 1990s.

SEE ALSO: Raspberry Pi 3 launches! 10x faster, 64-bit Quad-Core CPU, built in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth

Supported games you can download and play include Beneath a Steel Sky, Flight of the Amazon Queen, Lure of the Temptress, and Broken Sword (a personal favorite of mine). You can also enjoy popular LucasArts games like The Secret of Monkey Island and The Day of the Tentacle and Full Throttle.

You can download ScummVM for Raspberry Pi from the downloads page here.

What was your favorite point and click adventure game?


Original URL: http://feeds.betanews.com/~r/bn/~3/q7hM7jG02xo/

Original article

GitHub Pages for Non-Rubyists

Recently I wanted to clean up the online resources for Python Crash Course. I’d been using a number of markdown files in the project’s repository, but for someone new to GitHub there’s a lot of visual clutter on a page like this. After setting up GitHub Pages, that page is much cleaner. I had never written a line of Ruby code in my life before doing this, so I learned a fair bit in the process.

Many online resources walk you through the process of setting up GitHub Pages for a project, but most of these assume your system is already set up for working on Ruby projects. This guide assumes you have no background with Ruby.

Building the Main Page

Let’s start out with a simple project, with a README.md file in the root directory. If you’d like to follow along, I made a simple project called Hello Worlds. It has a few Hello World programs in different languages, each in a separate directory. The project has a README.md file in the root directory, and one in each language’s directory as well. To work with this project, fork it and make a clone on your system. I’m starting out with a fresh installation of Ubuntu 14.04, so I’ll need to install git before cloning the repository:

$ sudo apt-get install git
$ git clone https://github.com/username/hello_worlds.git

Note that you should be cloning your own fork of hello_worlds, not my repository. This way you’ll be able to push your own version of GitHub pages for the project. The home page for Hello Worlds looks like a typical project page on GitHub:

GitHub project home page

Now let’s use GitHub’s page generator to make a cleaner home page for the project. Go to the repository’s page on GitHub, and click the Settings tab. Scroll down to the GitHub Pages section and click the Launch automatic page generator button. You can change the project name and tagline if you don’t like what’s automatically generated. Since our project already has a README.md file, click the Load README.md button. Then click Continue to Layouts. Choose a theme, and click Publish page. Now you can see your project’s clean home page at http://username.github.io/hello_worlds/.

The resulting page is much cleaner:

GitHub pages home page

If your project only needs a single page, you’re finished. Any time you update your project’s README, repeat these steps and you’ll have an updated project page as well. But many projects benefit from additional pages, so let’s add a few pages using a template.

Setting up a GitHub Pages development environment

When we used GitHub’s page generator, a new branch called gh-pages was created in our project’s repository. Let’s fetch this branch, and work with it locally:

hello_worlds$ git fetch origin gh-pages
hello_worlds$ git checkout gh-pages
hello_worlds$ ls
index.html  params.json  stylesheets

GitHub’s page generator has converted the README.md file to an HTML file called index.html. It’s also created a params.json file, and a set of stylesheets as well. You can build additional pages by writing HTML manually, but that’s pretty inefficient. Let’s set up Jekyll so we can create additional pages by simply writing markdown files.

Installing Ruby

GitHub Pages requires Ruby 2.1.7 or higher, and the standard Ruby in the 14.04 archives is Ruby 1.9. We’ll use rbenv to install a more recent version of Ruby. This will also set Ruby up in a way that makes it easy to develop other Ruby projects at some point.

We need to install several libraries:

$ sudo apt-get install -y zlib1g-dev libssl-dev libreadline-dev

If you’re typing these commands by hand, note there’s a one before the g in zlib1g-dev, not the letter l. Now we’ll set up rbenv and ruby-build:

$ git clone https://github.com/rbenv/rbenv.git ~/.rbenv
$ echo 'export PATH="$HOME/.rbenv/bin:$PATH"' >> ~/.bashrc
$ echo 'eval "$(rbenv init -)"' >> ~/.bashrc
$ git clone https://github.com/rbenv/ruby-build.git ~/.rbenv/plugins/ruby-build

Open a new terminal window, so these changes take effect. Now you can see the versions of Ruby that are available for installation:

The latest stable version at the time of this writing is 2.3.0. I like to see that the installer is making progress, so I include the -v flag when using the rbenv install command. The final command rbenv global 2.3.0 tells your system to use version 2.3.0 if no other version of Ruby is specified for a particular project:

$ rbenv install -v 2.3.0
$ rbenv global 2.3.0

Now we can install bundler, which installs and manages Ruby gems efficiently. Note that you don’t need sudo when installing gems with this approach.

Now create a file called Gemfile in the project’s root directory, while on the gh-pages branch:

hello_worlds$ git status
On branch gh-pages
hello_worlds$ touch Gemfile

Add these two lines to Gemfile:

source 'https://rubygems.org'
gem 'github-pages'

Now run the following two commands in the project’s root directory. This will install the github-pages gem and a bunch of required libraries. The second command will build a local version of our GitHub Pages site:

hello_worlds$ bundle install
hello_worlds$ bundle exec jekyll build --safe

Now we can start the Jekyll server, and see our pages locally:

hello_worlds$ bundle exec jekyll serve

You can see your site at http://localhost:4000/.

Ignoring the _site/ directory

Let’s see what Jekyll built for us:

hello_worlds$ ls
Gemfile  Gemfile.lock  index.html  params.json  _site  stylesheets

There’s a new directory called _site/. This is an auto-generated directory which contains the resources needed to serve a static site. We don’t want to commit this, so let’s make a .gitignore file and add _site/ to it:

hello_worlds$ touch .gitignore
hello_worlds$ echo "_site/" >> .gitignore

Let’s commit the changes we’ve made so far:

hello_worlds$ git status
On branch gh-pages
hello_worlds$ git add .
hello_worlds$ git commit -am "Added .gitignore, set up github-pages."

Building additional pages

With Jekyll serving our pages locally, we can build out the rest of the pages and then push them live. To match our project’s directory structure we’ll make three directories. Let’s start with the python directory:

hello_worlds$ mkdir python

Let’s copy the python/README.md file into this directory. You can do this by checking out the file from the master branch, while in the gh-pages branch.

hello_worlds$ git checkout master python/README.md

If you’ve stopped the Jekyll server, start it again with the command bundle exec jekyll serve. You can visit the python README file at http://localhost:4000/python/README.md. You’ll just see the raw markdown file in the browser:

Python README.md

Now we’ll modify python/README.md slightly so Jekyll processes the file and serves it as an HTML page. Add two lines of triple dashes at the top of python/README.md:

---
---
Hello World in Python
===

Now visit http://localhost:4000/python/README.html. The triple dash header tells Jekyll to process the markdown file and render it as an HTML page.

Python README.html

Some characters may not render properly, but they’ll display properly by the time we’re finished styling the page.

Using a layout

We’d like to apply the same theme to all of our pages. We can do this using layouts. Make a _layouts directory. Then copy the index file to the _layouts directory, with the name default.html:

hello_worlds$ mkdir _layouts
hello_worlds$ cp index.html _layouts/default.html

Now let’s look at default.html. We need to keep the parts that should be on all pages, and define variables for the sections that will change from page to page:

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<html lang="en-us">
  
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    </span>Hello worlds by ehmatthes<span>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="stylesheets/normalize.css" media="screen">
    <link href='https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css'>
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="stylesheets/stylesheet.css" media="screen">
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="stylesheets/github-light.css" media="screen">
  
  
    <section class="page-header">
      <h1 class="project-name">Hello worlds
      <h2 class="project-tagline">Hello World in a variety of languages.
      <a href="https://github.com/ehmatthes/hello_worlds" class="btn">View on GitHub
      <a href="https://github.com/ehmatthes/hello_worlds/zipball/master" class="btn">Download .zip
      <a href="https://github.com/ehmatthes/hello_worlds/tarball/master" class="btn">Download .tar.gz
    

    <section class="main-content">
      

<a id="hello-worlds" class="anchor" href="#hello-worlds" aria-hidden="true"><span aria-hidden="true" class="octicon octicon-link">Hello Worlds

This is a collection of Hello World programs in a number of different languages.

  • Hello World in <a href="python/README.md">Python.
  • Hello World in <a href="ruby/README.md">Ruby.
  • Hello World in <a href="c/README.md">C.
<footer class="site-footer"> <span class="site-footer-owner"><a href="https://github.com/ehmatthes/hello_worlds">Hello worlds is maintained by <a href="https://github.com/ehmatthes">ehmatthes. <span class="site-footer-credits">This page was generated by <a href="https://pages.github.com">GitHub Pages using the <a href="https://github.com/jasonlong/cayman-theme">Cayman theme by <a href="https://twitter.com/jasonlong">Jason Long.

We’ll use three variables. On lines 7, 9, and 10 the variable {{ site.baseurl }} makes sure stylesheets are accessible from any directory level. The variable {{ page.title }} on line 23 replaces the title of the page, and on line 25 {{ content }} replaces the main content on each subpage:

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<html lang="en-us">
  
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    </span>Hello worlds by ehmatthes<span>
    <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="{{ site.baseurl }}/stylesheets/normalize.css" media="screen">
    <link href='https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css'>
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="{{ site.baseurl }}/stylesheets/stylesheet.css" media="screen">
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="{{ site.baseurl }}/stylesheets/github-light.css" media="screen">
  
  
    <section class="page-header">
      <h1 class="project-name">Hello worlds
      <h2 class="project-tagline">Hello World in a variety of languages.
      <a href="https://github.com/ehmatthes/hello_worlds" class="btn">View on GitHub
      <a href="https://github.com/ehmatthes/hello_worlds/zipball/master" class="btn">Download .zip
      <a href="https://github.com/ehmatthes/hello_worlds/tarball/master" class="btn">Download .tar.gz
    

    <section class="main-content">
      

<a id="hello-worlds" class="anchor" href="#hello-worlds" aria-hidden="true"><span aria-hidden="true" class="octicon octicon-link">{{ page.title }}

{{ content }} <footer class="site-footer"> <span class="site-footer-owner"><a href="https://github.com/ehmatthes/hello_worlds">Hello worlds is maintained by <a href="https://github.com/ehmatthes">ehmatthes. <span class="site-footer-credits">This page was generated by <a href="https://pages.github.com">GitHub Pages using the <a href="https://github.com/jasonlong/cayman-theme">Cayman theme by <a href="https://twitter.com/jasonlong">Jason Long.

The site.baseurl variable is an empty variable for this project, but it allows the stylesheet links to be generated properly regardless of which directory level a page is saved in. When Jekyll processes a page that uses the default layout, it will use the HTML in default.html and fill in the values of the page.title and content variables.

We need to modify python/README.md so it will be rendered with the default layout, and we need to set its page title variable:

---
layout: default
title: Hello World in Python
---

Hello World is one line in Python:

    print("Hello Python world!")

The `print()` function displays the string you specify, in this case "Hello Python world!" to the screen. To run the program, enter `python hello.py` in a terminal session.

---

Return to [Hello Worlds](../README.md).

When writing markdown pages that Jekyll will process, we set the values for any page variables in the front matter between the first two sets of triple dashes. Here we set the layout to default and the title to Hello World in Python. Jekyll will insert this value whereever {{ page.title }} appears in the default.html layout. Anything that follows the second triple dash will be inserted wherever {{ page.content }} appears in the default layout.

We should also make a _config.yml file. This is where we can define site-wide variables such as site.baseurl:

hello_worlds$ touch _config.yml
hello_worlds$ echo "baseurl:" >> _config.yml

There’s no value for baseurl, but it’s still good to have an explicit _config.yml file so we’re not wondering if it got deleted when we look at this project at a later time.

Now when we look at localhost:4000/python/README.html in the browser it uses the same theme as the index page:

Python README with theme

Let’s commit these changes:

hello_worlds$ git status
On branch gh-pages
hello_worlds$ git add .
hello_worlds$ git commit -am "Python readme uses layout theme."

Modifying links

Let’s make sure the links from the home page to the subpages work, and the links back to the home page work. In index.html we have a link to the python/README.md page:

  • Hello World in <a href="python/README.md">Python.
  • The page that’s actually served is python/README.html, so all we need to do is change .md to .html. Let’s correct the other two links while we’re at it:

    • Hello World in <a href="python/README.html">Python.
    • Hello World in <a href="ruby/README.html">Ruby.
    • Hello World in <a href="c/README.html">C.

    In python/README.md we have the following:

    Return to [Hello Worlds](../README.md).
    

    The home page is called index.html now instead of README.md:

    Return to [Hello Worlds](../index.html).
    

    Refresh localhost:4000/python/README.html, and you should be able to click back and forth between the home page and the Python page.

    Modifying the theme for subpages

    Before we add the Ruby and C pages, let’s modify the theme slightly for the subpages. A large header looks reasonable on a project’s home page, but it’s distracting when used on every page in a site. Let’s remove the download buttons, shrink the vertical size of the header, and turn the project title into a link back to the home page.

    Make the following changes in default.html:

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    <html lang="en-us">
      
        <meta charset="UTF-8">
        </span>Hello worlds by ehmatthes<span>
        <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1">
        <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="{{ site.baseurl }}/stylesheets/normalize.css" media="screen">
        <link href='https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css'>
        <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="{{ site.baseurl }}/stylesheets/stylesheet.css" media="screen">
        <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="{{ site.baseurl }}/stylesheets/github-light.css" media="screen">
        <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="{{ site.baseurl }}/stylesheets/my_styles.css">
      
      
        <section class="page-header page-header-subpages">
          <h1 class="project-name"><a href="{{ site.baseurl }}/index.html" class="link-no-style">Hello worlds
          <h2 class="project-tagline">Hello World in a variety of languages.
        
    
        <section class="main-content">
          

    <a id="hello-worlds" class="anchor" href="#hello-worlds" aria-hidden="true"><span aria-hidden="true" class="octicon octicon-link">{{ page.title }}

    {{ content }} <footer class="site-footer"> <span class="site-footer-owner"><a href="https://github.com/ehmatthes/hello_worlds">Hello worlds is maintained by <a href="https://github.com/ehmatthes">ehmatthes. <span class="site-footer-credits">This page was generated by <a href="https://pages.github.com">GitHub Pages using the <a href="https://github.com/jasonlong/cayman-theme">Cayman theme by <a href="https://twitter.com/jasonlong">Jason Long.

    On line 11 we link to a new stylesheet, my_styles.css. This is listed after the automatically generated stylesheets so we can override some aspects of the theme we adopted from GitHub. In the page-header section (line 15) we make “Hello Worlds” a link back to the home page; the use of the site.baseurl variable means this link will work from any directory level. We don’t want the typical link style applied to the project title, so we add a class called link-no-style to the anchor tag. We also add a new selector page-header-subpages to the section, so we can override some of the header styles on subpages (line 14).

    Let’s make the my_styles.css file:

    hello_worlds$ touch stylesheets/my_styles.css
    

    Here’s what goes in my_styles.css:

    a.link-no-style {
      color: inherit;
    }
    
    
    @media screen and (min-width: 64em) {
      .page-header-subpages {
        padding: 0.5rem 0.6rem; } }
    
    @media screen and (min-width: 42em) and (max-width: 64em) {
      .page-header-subpages {
        padding: 0.3rem 0.4rem; } }
    
    @media screen and (max-width: 42em) {
      .page-header-subpages {
        padding: 0.2rem 0.1rem; } }
    

    The first selector causes links to keep their original color instead of taking on the standard blue that most links have. The three page-header-subpages selectors shrink the vertical and horizontal padding by appropriate amounts on various display devices.

    We no longer need a link to the home page in the body of the text, so let’s simplify python/README.md:

    ---
    layout: default
    title: Hello World in Python
    ---
    
    Hello World is one line in Python:
    
        print("Hello Python world!")
    
    The `print()` function displays the string you specify, in this case "Hello Python world!" to the screen. To run the program, enter `python hello.py` in a terminal session.
    

    Now when you look at the home page it will look the same as it did earlier. The Python subpage will have a smaller header, allowing readers to focus more on the specific content of that page:

    Python README with smaller header

    Adding more pages

    At this point it’s fairly straightforward to add the Ruby and C pages. Let’s make directories for each of these pages, and copy the README.md files from the master branch:

    hello_worlds$ mkdir ruby c
    hello_worlds$ git checkout master ruby/README.md
    hello_worlds$ git checkout master c/README.md
    

    We need to add the front matter to ruby/README.md:

    ---
    layout: default
    title: Hello World in Ruby
    ---
    
    Hello World is one line in Ruby:
    
        puts("Hello Ruby world!")
    
    The method `puts()` displays the given string "Hello Ruby world!" to the screen and adds a newline as well. To run the program, enter `ruby hello.rb` in a terminal session.
    

    We specify the default layout and the title for this page. We remove the title we had in the body of the file, and we remove the link to the home page from the body as well. Now you can go to the home page and click on the link to Ruby, and you should see a clean page for Ruby just as we saw for Python:

    Ruby README page

    The changes to c/README.md are straightforward as well.

    Committing and pushing changes

    To see your changes live, make a commit and push the gh-pages branch to GitHub:

    hello_worlds$ git status
    On branch gh-pages
    hello_worlds$ git add .
    hello_worlds$ git commit -am "Added Python, Ruby, and C pages."
    hello_worlds$ git status
    On gh-pages
    hello_worlds$ git push origin gh-pages
    

    Making new pages

    To add a new page to your project’s site, create a new markdown page. Start with the front matter:

    ---
    layout: default
    title: My New Page
    ---
    

    Then you can simply write markdown, and Jekyll will convert your markdown to HTML. Whenever you push the gh-pages branch, GitHub will update your live pages.

    I hope you and your users enjoy your cleaner project pages!


    Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/B54C1kgk8T8/

    Original article

    Show HN: Free document summarizer

    Intellexer Summarizer – Online Demo

    This page demonstrates capabilities of IES for creation of various client-server applications.

    Step 1: Select a file or specify web page URL

    Step 3: Selected file or web page URL

    Selected document:
    http://summarizer.intellexer.com/order_summarizer_pro.php
    Document structure – Auto
    Summary type
    Auto

    Click the link below to select another document or modify settings:

    << Back to settings

    Document summary (10 sentences):


    Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/nP46SUiD_fo/summarizer.html

    Original article

    Xbox Live now supports cross-platform multiplayer with PS4

    Xbox Console At this point, there’s very little difference between the Xbox One and the PlayStation 4. But there was one key differentiating point. Xbox gamers could only play with Xbox and PC players as Microsoft was restricting access to the multiplayer component. Microsoft just announced that game developers can now create cross-platform multiplayer modes th Read More


    Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Techcrunch/~3/5YHgw-_XdM8/

    Original article

    WD’s $31 PiDrive can make your Raspberry Pi 3 a PC


    Original URL: http://www.computerworld.com/article/3043995/data-storage/wds-31-pidrive-can-make-your-raspberry-pi-3-a-pc.html#tk.rss_all

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    Raspberry Pi Gets Affordable, Power Efficient 314GB Hard Drive On Pi Day

    Mickeycaskill writes: Western Digital has released a had drive optimized for the Raspberry Pi. The 314GB drive, released on Pi Day (3/14), costs $31.42 for a limited time and promises to be more reliable, power efficient and easier to use with the computer than other storage. The company, which also has a 1TB drive, says the unit has been designed to coordinate with the Pi’s own power systems in order to minimize energy use without affecting the maximum data transfer rate on a USB connection. The Raspberry Pi Foundation says the new drive will stimulate the development of storage-hungry projects.


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