Jq – A Command-line JSON processor

jq is like sed for JSON data – you can use it to slice and filter
and map and transform structured data with the same ease that sed,
awk, grep and friends let you play with text.

jq is written in portable C, and it has zero runtime
dependencies. You can download a single binary, scp it to a far away
machine, and expect it to work.

jq can mangle the data format that you have into the one that you
want with very little effort, and the program to do so is often
shorter and simpler than you’d expect.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/3Y858YNfM1Y/

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Bimodal Salary Distribution for New Law School Graduates

Class of 2013

For more information on the Class of 2013 salary distribution curve, see The NALP Salary Curve for the Class of 2013

Distribution of Reported Full-Time Salaries — Class of 2013

Note: Graph is based on 21,545 salaries reported for full-time jobs lasting a year or more. A few salaries above $205,000 are excluded from the graph for clarity, but not from the percentage calculations. The left-hand peaks of the graph reflect salaries of $40,000 to $65,000, which collectively accounted for about half of reported salaries. The right-hand peak shows that salaries of $160,000 accounted for about 17% of reported salaries. However, more complete salary coverage for jobs at large law firms heightens this peak and diminishes the left-hand peaks — and shows that the unadjusted mean overstates the average starting salary by just over 5%. Nonetheless, as both the arithmetic mean and the adjusted mean show, relatively few salaries are close to either mean. For purposes of this graph, all reported salaries were rounded to the nearest $5,000.

Class of 2012

For more information on the Class of 2012 salary distribution curve, see The NALP Salary Curve for the Class of 2012

Distribution of Reported Full-Time Salaries — Class of 2012

Note: Graph is based on 20,709 salaries reported for full-time jobs lasting a year or more. A few salaries above $205,000 are excluded from the graph for clarity, but not from the percentage calculations. The left-hand peaks of the graph reflect salaries of $40,000 to $65,000, which collectively accounted for about 51% of reported salaries. The right-hand peak shows that salaries of $160,000 accounted for about 16% of reported salaries. However, more complete salary coverage for jobs at large law firms heightens this peak and diminishes the left-hand peaks — and shows that the unadjusted mean overstates the average starting salary by about 7%. Nonetheless, as both the arithmetic mean and the adjusted mean show, relatively few salaries are close to either mean. For purposes of this graph, all reported salaries were rounded to the nearest $5,000.

Class of 2011

For more information on the Class of 2011 salary distribution curve, see The NALP Salary Curve for the Class of 2011

Distribution of Reported Full-Time Salaries — Class of 2011

Note: The graph above is based on 18,630 salaries reported for full-time jobs lasting a year or more — a few salaries above $200,000 are excluded from the graph for clarity, but not from the percentage calculations. The left-hand peaks of the graph reflect salaries of $40,000 to $65,000, which collectively accounted for about 52% of reported salaries. The right-hand peak shows that salaries of $160,000 accounted for about 14% of reported salaries. However, more complete salary coverage for jobs at large law firms heightens this peak and diminishes the left-hand peaks — and shows that the unadjusted mean overstates the average starting salary by just over 6%. Nonetheless, as both the arithmetic mean and the adjusted mean show, relatively few salaries are close to either mean. For purposes of this graph, all reported salaries were rounded to the nearest $5,000.

Class of 2010

For more information on the Class of 2010 salary distribution curve, see The NALP Salary Curve Morphs with the Class of 2010

Distribution of Reported Full-Time Salaries

Note: The graph above is based on 18,398 salaries. A few salaries above $200,000 are excluded for clarity. The left-hand peaks of the graph reflect salaries of $40,000 to $65,000, which collectively accounted for about 48% of reported salaries. The right-hand peak shows that salaries of $160,000 accounted for about 18% of reported salaries. However, more complete salary coverage for jobs at large law firms heightens this peak and diminishes the left-hand peaks — and shows that the unadjusted mean overstates the average starting salary by about 9%. Nonetheless, as both the arithmetic mean and the adjusted mean show, relatively few salaries are close to either mean figure. For purposes of this graph, all reported salaries were rounded to the nearest $5,000.

Class of 2009

For more information on the Class of 2009 salary distribution curve, see Salary Distribution Curve for the Class of 2009 Shows Relatively Few Salaries Were Close to the Mean

Distribution of Reported Full-Time Salaries — Class of 2009

Note: The graph is based on 19,513 salaries. A few salaries above $200,000 are excluded for clarity. The left-hand peaks of the graph reflect salaries of $40,000 to $65,000, which collectively accounted for 42% of reported salaries.The right-hand peak shows that salaries of $160,000 accounted for 25% of reported salaries. However, more complete salary coverage for jobs at large law firms heightens this peak and diminishes the left-hand peaks — and shows that the unadjusted mean overstates the average starting salary by about 10%. Nonetheless, as both the arithmetic mean and the adjusted mean show, relatively few salaries are close to either mean figure. For purposes of this graph, all reported salaries were rounded to the nearest $5,000.

Class of 2008

For more information on the Class of 2008 salary distribution curve, see Starting Salary Distribution for Class of 2008 More Dramatic than Previous Years

Distribution of Full-Time Salaries — Class of 2008

Note: Graph is based on 22,305 salaries; a few salaries about $200,000 are excluded for clarity. Collectively, salaries of $40,000 – $65,000 accounted for 42% of reported salaries.

Class of 2007

For more information on the Class of 2007 salary distribution curve, see Another Picture Worth 1,000 Words.


Source:Jobs & JD’s, Class of 2007

Note: The graph is based on 23,337 salaries. A few salaries above $200,000 are excluded for clarity. 

Class of 2006

For more information on the Class of 2006 salary distribution curve, see A Picture Worth 1,000 Words.


Source:
Jobs & JD’s, Class of 2006. For the purposes of the Jobs and JD’s report, the curve was smoothed to more clearly illustrate the bimodal nature of the curve, and thus does not appear identical to the curve shown for the Class of 2006 in the January 2008 Bulletin column here. The curve presented in the January 2008 Bulletin article is also shown on a different scale for ease of comparison with previous years.
Note:
The graph is based on 22,665 salaries. A few salaries above $200,000
are excluded for clarity. The first peak in this graph reflects
salaries of both $40,000 and $50,000 (each about 11% of reported
salaries). The second peak reflects salaries of $135,000 (10% of
reported salaries) and $145,000 (7% of reported salaries).


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/g5CRSu-vh2c/salarydistrib

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JavaScript Devs: Is It Still Worth Learning jQuery?

Nerval’s Lobster writes: If you’re learning JavaScript and Web development, you might be wondering whether to learn jQuery. After nearly a decade of existence, jQuery has grown into a fundamental part of JavaScript coding in Web development. But now we’re at a point where many of the missing pieces (and additional features) jQuery filled in are present in browsers. So do you need to learn jQuery anymore? Some developers don’t think so. The official jQuery blog, meanwhile, is pushing a separate jQuery version for modern browsers, in an attempt to keep people involved. And there are still a few key reasons to keep learning jQuery: Legacy code. If you’re going to go to work at a company that already has JavaScript browser code, there’s a strong possibility it has jQuery throughout its code. There’s also a matter of preference: People still like jQuery and its elegance, and they’re going to continue using it, even though they might not have to.


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Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/a2CIDiI-06M/javascript-devs-is-it-still-worth-learning-jquery

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Imagination To Release Open MIPS Design To Academia

DeviceGuru writes: Imagination Technologies has developed a Linux-ready academic version of its 32-bit MIPS architecture MicroAptiv processor design, and is giving it away free to universities for use in computer research and education. As the MIPSfpga name suggests, the production-quality RTL (register transfer level) design abstraction is intended to run on industry standard FPGAs. Although MIPSfpga is available as a fully visible RTL design, MIPSfpga is not fully open source, according to the announcement from Robert Owen, Manager of Imagination’s University Programme. Academic users can use and modify MIPSfpga as they wish, but cannot build it into silicon. “If you modify it, you must talk to us first if you wish to patent the changes,” writes Owen.


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Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/pxS_6Hh-hAY/imagination-to-release-open-mips-design-to-academia

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No more see you next Wednesday as Addams Foundation closes down Adult Wednesday Addams

Sad news has been going around that “Adult Wednesday Addams,” the very marvelous fanmade online video series created by comedy actress Melissa Hunter, has been killed at least for the present by a copyright flag from the Tee & Charles Addams Foundation, which has taken it off air. “As many of you have seen, the Tee & […]

The post No more see you next Wednesday as Addams Foundation closes down Adult Wednesday Addams appeared first on TeleRead: News and views on e-books, libraries, publishing and related topics.


Original URL: http://www.teleread.com/horror-2/no-see-next-wednesday-addams-foundation-closes-adult-wednesday-addams/

Original article

Is Digitization Preservation?

That was the question that welcomed us on the morning of Day 2 at the law repositories conference in Williamsburg, Virginia. This session was billed as a “debate” between Sharon Bradley, University of Georgia School of Law, and Beth Williams, Louisiana State University Law Center, but it turned out that the two speakers didn’t really have much to disagree on; they both considered digitization a form of preservation.

Bradley stressed the need for libraries to get started. “Digitization can’t wait,” she said, “your books are deteriorating.” She sees digitization as a way to both protect the physical item from harm and preserve the intellectual content. Williams could not disagree and considered her position as a difference in emphasis.

She finds their motivation for digitization and preservation is as a means to provide access and framed the two terms like this:

  • Digitization = Access now
  • Preservation = Access later

Williams also pointed out that “digital media are fragile” noting that this is an area where everything quickly becomes obsolete. A long term approach to preservation must therefore consider the inevitable changes in technology to ensure that the digital files we access today will still be available in the future. In that respect she saw parallels in the disaster management process adding that organizational issues should also be considered and can be even more important than these inherent technical challenges.

Bradley agreed. The evaluation and organization of digital resources should be an ongoing process and our role as librarian and repositorians is really one of stewardship. It is our responsibility to minimize exposure of the physical items and ensure the authenticity of the digital object created to represent that original resource. Williams agreed and pointed to LIPA and the National Digital Stewards Alliance as sources to learn about standards and get guidance.

Williams mentioned these 4 principles from a 2012 OCLC report by Ricky Erway on managing born-digital resources created from physical media:

  • Do no harm (to the physical media or the content)
  • Don’t do anything that unnecessarily precludes future action and use
  • Don’t let the first two principles be obstacles to action
  • Document what you do

For me, preservation is more than just the act of digitizing a resource, although it’s definitely a start. It helps to preserve the original physical resource, and that’s a good thing, but digital resources will also need vigilant management. “Bit rot” can make files unreadable over time and steps need to be put in place to check and maintain the stability of digital files. Bradley recommended the migration of digital files every 3-5 years. The bepress platform uses the CLOCKSS protocol and repositories using this platform might consider investigating that option.

Unfortunately, neither the presentation slides nor a recording of this particular session are publicly available at this time.

Oh, and happy preservation week! [9]

Digital information lasts forever — or five years, whichever comes first.”—Jeff Rothenberg


Original URL: http://www.slaw.ca/2015/04/27/is-digitization-preservation/

Original article

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