Popular YouTubers Are Building Their Own Sites

An anonymous reader shares a report: Whether he’s showing off astronomically expensive computer gaming hardware or dumpster-diving for the cheapest PC builds possible, Linus Sebastian’s videos always strike a chord, and have made him one of the most popular tech personalities on YouTube. But Google-owned YouTube gets most episodes of Linus Tech Tips a week late. Now, they debut on his own site called Floatplane, which attracts a much smaller crowd. “Google has been very, very good to me,” Linus says. “But it’s a lot of eggs in one basket.” And with a staff of two dozen, he cannot rely on the company to continue being what he calls his “benevolent overlord”. He is not the only YouTube star looking for alternatives.

For a long time there have been tensions between those creating content on YouTube and the company providing the platform, ranging from disputes about ad revenue, to copyright


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/ixpoY6gO9JY/popular-youtubers-are-building-their-own-sites

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Will The Next Raspberry Pi CPU Have Built-in Machine Learning?

“At the recent tinyML Summit 2021, Raspberry Pi co-founder Eben Upton teased the future of ‘Pi Silicon’,” writes Tom’s Hardware, adding “It looks like machine learning could see a massive improvement thanks to Raspberry Pi’s news in-house chip development team…”

Raspberry Pi’s in-house application specific integrated circuit team are working on the next iteration, and seems to be focused on lightweight accelerators for ultra low power machine learning applications. During Upton’s talk at 40 minutes the slide changes and we see “Future Directions,” a slide that shows three current generation ‘Pi Silicon’ boards, two of which are from board partners, SparkFun’s MicroMod RP2040 and Arduino’s Nano RP2040 Connect. The third is from ArduCam and they are working on the ArduCam Pico4ML which incorporates machine learning, camera, microphone and screen into a the Pico package.

The last bullet point hints at what the future silicon could be. It may come in the


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/Z8i4LVftMLc/will-the-next-raspberry-pi-cpu-have-built-in-machine-learning

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Torvalds Warns the World: Don’t Use the Linux 5.12-rc1 Kernel

“In a message to the Linux Kernel Mailing List Wednesday, founding developer Linus Torvalds warned the world not to use the 5.12-rc1 kernel in his public git tree…” writes Ars Technica:

As it turns out, when Linus Torvalds flags some code dontuse, he really means it — the problem with this 5.12 release candidate broke swapfile handling in a very unpleasant way. Specifically, the updated code would lose the proper offset pointing to the beginning of the swapfile. Again, in Torvalds’ own words, “swapping still happened, but it happened to the wrong part of the filesystem, with the obvious catastrophic end results.”

If your imagination is insufficient, this means that when the kernel paged contents of memory out to disk, the data would land on random parts of the same disk and partition the swapfile lived on… not as files, mind you, but as garbage spewed directly to raw sectors on


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/JQgRd1mXGVs/torvalds-warns-the-world-dont-use-the-linux-512-rc1-kernel

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Why the ‘Small Internet’ Movement Wants to Revive Gopher

Long-time Slashdot reader lee1 shares a new article from Linux magazine:

The danger and irritations of the modern web have unleashed a movement dedicated to creating a safer and simpler alternative. The old Gopher network and the new Gemini protocol have emerged as building blocks for this new “small Internet.”

Anyone who has used the World Wide Web (WWW) lately knows that something bad is happening to it. It does not resemble the WWW of the early years, with enthusiastic amateurs freely sharing ideas and information. These things still exist, and the web is still an indispensable medium connecting the world. But the web experience is now encumbered with advertising, invasions of privacy in the form of pervasive tracking, enormous file sizes, CPU straining JavaScript, the danger of exploits, and door slams asking you to subscribe to a newsletter before viewing a site.

This unpleasant environment has led to a backlash.


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/pk0V7pfzOYs/why-the-small-internet-movement-wants-to-revive-gopher

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Torvalds warns the world: Don’t use the Linux 5.12-rc1 kernel

Enlarge / Penguins aren’t all equally trustworthy. (credit: Bernard Spragg)
In a message to the Linux Kernel Mailing List yesterday, founding developer Linus Torvalds warned the world not to use the 5.12-rc1 kernel in his public git tree.
Hey peeps – some of you may have already noticed that in my public git tree, the “v5.12-rc1” tag has magically been renamed to “v5.12-rc1-dontuse”. It’s still the same object, it still says “v5.12-rc1” internally and it is still is signed by me, but the user-visible name of the tag has changed.
As it turns out, when Linus Torvalds flags some code dontuse, he really means it—the problem with this 5.12 release candidate broke swapfile handling in a very unpleasant way. Specifically, the updated code would lose the proper offset pointing to the beginning of the swapfile. Again, in Torvalds’ own words, “swapping still happened, but it happened to the wrong part of the


Original URL: https://arstechnica.com/?p=1747460

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