How ‘Mission Impossible’ Made the Leap To 4K and HDR

In the run up to the release of Fallout, the new movie in the Mission Impossible franchise, Paramount studio re-released the entire Mission Impossible series on 4K Blu-ray last month. The new discs aren’t only a huge upgrade for cinephiles — they’re also a fascinating glimpse at how studios can revive older films for the 4K/HDR era. Engadget: “In terms of any re-transfers or remastering that we are doing for our HDR releases, we will go back to the highest resolution source available,” Kirsten Pielstick, manager of Paramount’s digital mastering group, said in an interview. In the case of Mission Impossible 1 and 2, that involved scanning the original 35mm negatives in 4K/16-bit. As you’d expect, the studio tries to get the original artists involved with any remasters, especially with something like HDR, which allows for higher brightness and more nuanced black levels. Pielstick worked with the director of photography


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Almond – The Open Virtual Assistant

Almond is the world first Communicating Virtual Assistant: through Almond you can interact not only
with your services, but also access that of your friends, family and colleagues.To protect your privacy, Almond allows you to set flexible access control policies, based on time of
day, on your location, on the content of the request, or really on any information available to Almond.
For example, your parents can monitor your security camera, only if you’re not home, or only
at a certain time of the day.Finally, to guarantee your privacy, Almond runs all its actions and computation locally. If you so choose,
you can have your own installation of Almond in your phone or your laptop. If you use Web Almond, your
data is encrypted and stored in a secure enclave not accessible by anybody else.


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/ckD2dnurTWk/

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6 efficiency-enhancing Android apps

Your phone is now essentially your personal assistant — and like any aide, it needs the right set of tools to do its job effectively.The good news? As an Android user, you’ve got no shortage of efficiency-enhancing options. Unlike other mobile platforms, Android affords you the opportunity to customize and control the core user interface to make it better suited to your needs. And while the more advanced UI-adjusting tools tend to be targeted at the power-user crowd, you don’t have to be a card-carrying geek to take advantage of what they offer.Behold: six innovative apps that’ll empower your favorite high-tech helper and allow it to reach its full productivity potential.To read this article in full, please click here


Original URL: https://www.computerworld.com/article/3208108/android/android-apps-efficiency-timesaving.html#tk.rss_all

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Mailinator.com: Anatomy of a Spammy Campaign

Mailinator is a popular disposable email service. It’s also become a great tool for QA Teams to test email receipt, acknowledgment, authentication loops, and formatting. But in the beginning (um, wow – 15 years ago? really?) it was a tool to help people avoid spam.Mailinator gets many millions of emails per day. At peak, it can be thousands of emails per second. Over time it has become ever more efficient at dealing with the deluge; processing, compressing, storing, and analyzing them.  Once someone uses a Mailinator address, they tend to abandon it and use a different one next time. But the Internet never forgets. It seems like every Mailinator address ever used has found its way onto a marketing list somewhere.Here’s a picture of the last 6 days of email entering the system:Six days of frequent Subjects coming to Mailinator
This graph (click on the image for a bigger version) shows


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/feedsapi/BwPx/~3/OhUP-KphXP0/mailinatorcom-anatomy-of-spammy-campaign.html

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Why Gov.uk content should be published in HTML and not PDF

GOV.UK exists to make government services and information as easy as possible to find and use.
For that reason, we’re not huge fans of PDFs on GOV.UK.
Compared with HTML content, information published in a PDF is harder to find, use and maintain. More importantly, unless created with sufficient care PDFs can often be bad for accessibility and rarely comply with open standards. Many departments are doing great work to move away from them. For example, the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) blogged about how it created and published its strategy in HTML and Public Health England has written about its work to move away from PDFs. 
Content managed by the GOV.UK team in GDS is entirely in HTML and the training, guidance and tools we provide for publishers encourage HTML by default. However, we still have around 200,000 PDFs on GOV.UK and we’re publishing tens of thousands of new ones


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Generating Screenshots of URLs Using Google’s Secret Magic API

The Problem

Being a developer, I have always wondered what would be the best way to capture screenshots of URLs. There are a lot of use cases for this. Consider the following ones:

When a link is posted, we could show a thumbnail of it.
When a URL is inputted by the user, we can fetch the screenshot to show if that’s the intended one.
Testing the URL on different browsers.
Testing if the URL is accessible by the public.
And so on. Getting a screenshot of a rendered URL requires a lot of work:

You need a complete headless server that’s connected to the internet.
The server should have a browser that’s compatible with the web standards.
There are also screen resolution requirements – mobile or desktop.
When I tried looking at the available options that I have, here’s what I get:

Having said everything above, I gave up my idea of getting this thing working. I started


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