Google Resumes Its Attack on the URL Bar, Hides Full Addresses on Chrome 86

An anonymous reader shares a report: Google has tried on and off for years to hide full URLs in Chrome’s address bar, because apparently long web addresses are scary and evil. Despite the public backlash that came after every previous attempt, Google is pressing on with new plans to hide all parts of web addresses except the domain name in Chrome 86, this time accompanied by an admittedly hover animation. The new look builds upon the animation-less hover reveal that’s already in testing, but in contrast to that method, the improved variant also displays the protocol and the subdomain, which remain invisible in the older version. That’s achieved with a neat sliding animation that moves over the visible part of the URL to make space for the strings preceding it.

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Amazon ECS Now Supports EC2 Inf1 Instances

As machine learning and deep learning models become more sophisticated, hardware acceleration is increasingly required to deliver fast predictions at high throughput. Today, we’re very happy to announce that AWS customers can now use the Amazon EC2 Inf1 instances on Amazon ECS, for high performance and the lowest prediction cost in the cloud. For a few weeks now, these instances have also been available on Amazon Elastic Kubernetes Service.
A primer on EC2 Inf1 instancesInf1 instances were launched at AWS re:Invent 2019. They are powered by AWS Inferentia, a custom chip built from the ground up by AWS to accelerate machine learning inference workloads.
Inf1 instances are available in multiple sizes, with 1, 4, or 16 AWS Inferentia chips, with up to 100 Gbps network bandwidth and up to 19 Gbps EBS bandwidth. An AWS Inferentia chip contains four NeuronCores. Each one implements a high-performance systolic array matrix multiply engine,


Original URL: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/AmazonWebServicesBlog/~3/tabsX62Nap8/

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Epic’s Battle For ‘Open Platforms’ Ignores Consoles’ Massive Closed Market

Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo demand the same platform control — and the same 30% fee. From a report: Yesterday, Epic used Fortnite to essentially wage open war against Apple’s and Google’s mobile app marketplaces. First it added a discounted “Epic Direct Payment” option alongside the standard iOS App Store and Google Play payment options in Fortnite, in direct violation of those stores’ policies. Then, when Fortnite was predictably removed from both platforms, Epic filed lawsuits against both companies, alleging “anti-competitive restraints and monopolistic practices” in the mobile app marketplace. That move came alongside a heavy-handed PR blitz, including a video asking players to “join the fight to stop 2020 from becoming ‘1984.’” But through this entire public fight for “open mobile platforms,” as Epic puts it, there is one major set of closed platforms that the company seems happy to continue doing business with. We’re speaking, of course, about video


Original URL: http://rss.slashdot.org/~r/Slashdot/slashdot/~3/LjJy_KRK6I0/epics-battle-for-open-platforms-ignores-consoles-massive-closed-market

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Apple boots Fortnite from the App Store after Epic adds direct payments

After its creator Epic Games implemented a workaround to duck Apple’s hefty developer fees, Fortnite has vanished from the App Store. The popular game’s disappearing act came the same day that Epic added a new direct payment option for in-game currency on mobile, offering an enticing 20% discount for players who pay the company for its virtual V-Bucks rather handing that money to intermediaries Apple or Google.
“Currently, when using Apple and Google payment options, Apple and Google collect a 30% fee, and the up to 20% price drop does not apply,” Epic wrote in a blog post introducing the new option. “If Apple or Google lower their fees on payments in the future, Epic will pass along the savings to you.”
Epic Direct Payments on iOS
In a statement to TechCrunch, Apple confirms that it removed Fortnite for taking the “unfortunate step” of violating App Store rules:
Epic enabled a feature in its


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Epic Games launches a campaign (and lawsuit) against Apple

Epic Games is launching an all-out campaign against Apple and its App Store rules.
Thursday morning, Epic Games introduced a new payment mechanic through a server side update that allowed gamers to purchase Fortnite’s in-game currency directly, allowing the app to bypass Apple’s in-app purchase framework and the substantial cut that Apple takes. Apple quickly acted in uniformly banning the app from the App Store.
Apple soon released a statement:
“Epic enabled a feature in its app which was not reviewed or approved by Apple, and they did so with the express intent of violating the App Store guidelines regarding in-app payments that apply to every developer who sells digital goods or services.”

Apple boots Fortnite from the App Store after Epic adds direct payments

The ban was an action Epic Games was ready for.
The company soon shared that they were taking legal action against Apple, alleging that they were abusing their market position, saying


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